BIGGER PICTURE: Shooting the Past; Thousands of Forgotten Images Detailing Birmingham's Role in the History of Photography Are Being Placed on a Digital Archive, Reports Richard McComb

The Birmingham Post (England), November 28, 2007 | Go to article overview

BIGGER PICTURE: Shooting the Past; Thousands of Forgotten Images Detailing Birmingham's Role in the History of Photography Are Being Placed on a Digital Archive, Reports Richard McComb


Byline: Richard McComb

For years, the photographs were stashed away in a broom cupboard, hidden from the public gaze, seemingly destined for oblivion.

The Birmingham Photographic Society, founded in 1856, was once hailed as one of the most important provincial photographic groups in the country. The work of its members captured the character of the Victorian era and detailed the changing face of Britain in the 20th century.

The Birmingham Photographic Society (BPS) had opened its first international exhibition on September 14, 1857 at the Hen and Chickens Hotel, in New Street. The society went on to hold acclaimed exhibitions, in partnership with the Royal Birmingham Society of Artists, in New Street, and was noted in particularly for its style of record and survey photography and pictorial photography. The work of its leading members was shown around the world.

Declining membership forced the society to merge with other amateur photographic societies, firstly with Hall Green, then Kings Heath Photographic Society.

Then digital cameras became widely accessible and affordable. Images could be brought to life at home with a USB cable and a PC. There was no requirement for films, dark rooms, or gentlemanly meetings and debates.

The BPS disappeared from the cultural landscape - and its archive was locked away in the forgotten recesses of the Birmingham and Midland Institute, where the defunct society once convened.

Fortunately, an inquisitive MA student, Peter James, discovered the mothballed archive while researching the history of art and design at the former Birmingham Polytechnic.

Peter, who today is head of photography at Birmingham Central Library, used to go along to Hall Green library and meet some of the BPS's older members, who in turn had known some of the pre-eminent photographers of the previous generation.

Peter says: "Some years later, having been employed to work on the collections in the library, we negotiated the deposit of the material."

The Central Library also holds the collection of the Midland Counties Photographic Federation, which taken together with the BPS archive means it boosts the largest collection of significant amateur club photography in the country. …

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BIGGER PICTURE: Shooting the Past; Thousands of Forgotten Images Detailing Birmingham's Role in the History of Photography Are Being Placed on a Digital Archive, Reports Richard McComb
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