Girl Power? in This Excoriating Attack, FAY WELDON Accuses the Spice Girls of Killing Feminism, Subverting Morality and with the Sheer Cynicism of Their Reunion Tour Embarrassing Us All; Shameless Spice: From Top Left, Mel C, Mel B, Emma Bunton and Victoria Beckham, with Geri Halliwell in That Dress

Daily Mail (London), December 5, 2007 | Go to article overview

Girl Power? in This Excoriating Attack, FAY WELDON Accuses the Spice Girls of Killing Feminism, Subverting Morality and with the Sheer Cynicism of Their Reunion Tour Embarrassing Us All; Shameless Spice: From Top Left, Mel C, Mel B, Emma Bunton and Victoria Beckham, with Geri Halliwell in That Dress


Byline: FAY WELDON

FORGIVE me for being blunt, but if a generation of our young womanhoodhas taken to binge drinking, Saturday night sluttishness and 'happy-slappings',I blame the Spice Girls. There are one or two other factors, I dare say, suchas the cult of consumerism, the decline of religion, easy credit, alco-pops,morning-after pills and the rest: but, if we're going to look for scapegoats,Posh, Ginger, Sporty, Baby and Scary are, surely, obvious candidates.

Though some will no doubt disagree, and argue that the Spice Girls are simply aslice of bubblegum pop history, I believe the aspirations and attitudes ofthese five women go hand-in-hand with the decline of our culture over the pastdecade.

Think back to those brilliant, suggestive, addictive pop songs of ten yearsback, when they swept across the nation's playgrounds: 'Well it's a Saturdaynight, You know the feeling is right, Don't you know we'll get so high.' Yeah!Grope, vomit, whoops: aren't we having fun? A decade on, the message has seepeddeep into the culture, with the results plain for all to see on every HighStreet on, yes, any Saturday night.

At first blush, of course, it was hard not to be seduced by those fiveperfectlybranded young women. They were brash and sassy, and seemed to bedriven by an unstoppable energy and a spirit of independence that defied themale race.

Looking back, alarm bells should have been ringing loud and clear. But, then,hindsight is a wonderful thing. What we thought was the ultimate triumph offeminism was, in fact, its death knell.

Girl Power was a sham, and its five proponents nothing more than desperatewannabes, not much better than today's reality TV stars, desperate for a quickfix of fame.

Now they're on tour again, soaring above the world in their specially charteredBoeing 747, along with their creches and their entourage. But this time aroundthe image they project is obviously and entirely contrived, with all thatyouthful zest replaced by weary cynicism.

The difference between those five breezily-sexual, energetic, bouncy girlssinging about Girl Power ten years back and the five sugar-coated, air-brushed,painfully-thin, desperate mums-on-tour is clear to see.

Seeing them strutting about the stage in weird Bacofoil-style corsetslike trussed-up festive turkeysin Canada this week, I found myself wishing this reunion had never taken place.I was embarrassed for them.

I also feel embarrassed for myself. And for feminism and for Britain, whoseflag has become far too synonymous with Spice Girl glory ever since Geri worethat dress nearly a decade ago.

I'm embarrassed for them because, despite the fact that they already have somuch, they are still desperately clinging on by their brittle, lacqueredacrylic nails to the fame which they so craved when they were young, and thehunger for which, it seems, has still not sated them.

All the riches and fame in the world wouldn't be enough to feed that hunger.

Somehow, they make rather a pathetic spectacle, these Spice Women (no longerSpice Girls) clinging to youth, celebrity, a tiny bum, and the fading memory ofa fabulous and fortuitous meeting with the then zeitgeist, when they sang aboutfriends and love and all the little girls (and the big ones, too) sang along.

It all seemed so empowering at the time: the idea that girls should take chargeof their own sexuality. But did anyone stop to think what would happen next?Now, with the dubious privilege of hindsight, we have the answer.

For a start, we are now living in the Age of Easy Couplings. What chance didformal sex education have when faced with the catchy lyricswritten by men, of coursethat told young girls to indulge in such things as 'weekend love' andencouraged 'playing games'? What it did of course was to separate love fromsex. THE Spice Girls killed romance.

Their singable, suggestive lyrics took away the innocence of the playgroundor at least what was left of it. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Girl Power? in This Excoriating Attack, FAY WELDON Accuses the Spice Girls of Killing Feminism, Subverting Morality and with the Sheer Cynicism of Their Reunion Tour Embarrassing Us All; Shameless Spice: From Top Left, Mel C, Mel B, Emma Bunton and Victoria Beckham, with Geri Halliwell in That Dress
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.