Demystifying Dyslexia

By McClure, Carla Thomas | District Administration, December 2007 | Go to article overview

Demystifying Dyslexia


McClure, Carla Thomas, District Administration


THE WORD DYSLEXIA IS rooted in the Greek language and means "difficulty with words." Although dyslexia is known as a problem related to reading, it can also interfere with a student's ability to write, spell and pronounce words correctly. It does not signal a lack of intelligence, talent or effort (famous dyslexics include Thomas Edison, Nelson Rockefeller and Henry Winkler). However, it is defined as a specific learning disability by the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD).

According to NICHD, dyslexia "is neurobiological in origin. It is characterized by difficulties with accurate and/ or fluent word recognition and by poor spelling and decoding abilities. These difficulties typically result from a deficit in the phonological component of language that is often unexpected in relation to other cognitive abilities and the provision of effective classroom instruction. Secondary consequences may include problems in reading comprehension and reduced reading experience that can impede growth of vocabulary and background knowledge."

Early Intervention

The International Dyslexia Association estimates that 15 to 20 percent of the population displays some dyslexia symptoms. Although dyslexia cannot be "cured," academic outcomes for dyslexic students can be greatly improved through early diagnosis and appropriate instruction. The only way to confirm a suspected diagnosis of dyslexia is through formal testing of reading, language and writing skills.

It is important to note that characteristics associated with dyslexia may also be present in children with other reading difficulties. Such difficulties can diminish over time, so educators who suspect dyslexia sometimes adopt a "wait and see" attitude. Not all children with dyslexia manifest the same kind or degree of difficulties, and a child's symptoms can fluctuate daily. Sometimes the symptoms are not severe enough to qualify for special education services. However, delay or denial of intervention can have negative long-term consequences on reading ability and academic performance.

Remediation

In recent years, brain scans have shown that dramatic differences can be found between the brain activity of dyslexic and nondyslexic children who are reading. In 2003, Elise Temple and colleagues used brain scans and standardized reading tests to demonstrate that intensive remediation can "rewire" the brains of dyslexic children. …

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