The Impact of Individual Ability, Favorable Team Member Scores, and Student Perception of Course Importance on Student Preference of Team-Based Learning and Grading Methods

By Su, Allan Yen-Lun | Adolescence, Winter 2007 | Go to article overview

The Impact of Individual Ability, Favorable Team Member Scores, and Student Perception of Course Importance on Student Preference of Team-Based Learning and Grading Methods


Su, Allan Yen-Lun, Adolescence


INTRODUCTION

The concept of work teams has received much attention in the hospitality and tourism industry. Companies such as Taco Bell, Ritz-Carlton, Marriott, Accor North America, and the Peabody Hotel have reported teamwork success stories (Bartlett, Probber, & Monammed, 1999; Frash Jr., Kline, & Stahura, 2004; Wolfe & Gould, 2001). Higher education hospitality programs have also discovered the power of teams. Many programs have sought to emphasize team-based learning experiences where students can practice collaboration skills and communication processes they will employ in the workplace (Cho, Schmelzer, & McMahon, 2002; Frash Jr. et al., 2004; LaLopa, Jacobs, & Hu, 1999; Postel, 1992). Many researchers have discussed the issues of team-based learning in the classroom, including the team selection process (Colbeck, Campbell, & Bjorklund, 2000; LaLopa, Jacobs, & Countryman, 1999; Muir & Tracy, 1999; Susskind & Borchgrevink, 1999); grading procedures, such as peer evaluation (Getty, 1996; Hass, Hass, & Wotruba, 1998); establishing team policies (LaLopa & Jacobs, 1998), and the effects of several team-related variables including individual ability, national diversity, gender diversity, and team size on team performance (Bacon, Stewart, & Stewart-Bell, 1998). However, little research has focused on factors affecting students' attitudes about teamwork. Wolfe and Gould (2001) indicated that students' attitudes toward teamwork improved after working in teams. Su (2004) explored the impact of teachers' grading methods on students' attitudes toward team-based learning, and revealed that students tend to project a more positive attitude toward team-based learning when the contingent grading method was used.

In order to understand the internal mechanism affecting students' attitudes toward team-based learning, two team-related variables--individual ability and favorable team member scores--were examined. The purpose of this study was to determine if the impact of individual ability and favorable team member scores on students' preferences of team-based learning and grading methods is mediated by students' perceived course importance. The correlation between perceived course importance and social loafing was also examined. An improved understanding of factors affecting students' attitudes toward team-based learning can help instructors adjust their methods of course administration and team assignment to achieve greater fairness and provide each team with its best chance for success.

LITERATURE REVIEW

Team-based Learning

In today's increasingly dynamic environment, the team concept has become a key to success for businesses, including those in hospitality and tourism. A team can be defined as "a collection of two or more individuals assembled for a common purpose, share a temporal exercise (past, present, or future), and interact with one another yet remain independent in some form or another" (Susskind & Borchgrevink, 1999). Cooper and Mueck (1990) defined team-based learning as "a structured, systematic, instructional strategy in which small groups work together toward a common goal" (p. 70). In the literature, different terms such as cooperative learning, collaborative learning, student groups, student teams, group learning, and small group learning all share the same definition with team-based learning (Bartlett et al., 1999; Frash Jr. et al., 2004; Getty, 1996; Jacobs, LaLopa, & Sorgule, 2001; Levi & Cadiz, 1998; Meyers, 1997; Smith & MacGregor, 2000; Springer, Stanne, & Donavon, 1999).

Team-based learning has broad applicability in many hospitality sectors, such as The Taco Bell Corporation, Ritz-Carlton, Marriott, Accor North America, and Peabody Hotel, as a way to strengthen market share, reduce employee turnover or execute a Total Quality Management Program (Bartlett et al., 1999; Frash Jr. et al. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

The Impact of Individual Ability, Favorable Team Member Scores, and Student Perception of Course Importance on Student Preference of Team-Based Learning and Grading Methods
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.