Junk Food Advertising Ban 'Not Enough' to Help Kids

Western Mail (Cardiff, Wales), January 1, 2008 | Go to article overview

Junk Food Advertising Ban 'Not Enough' to Help Kids


A ban on junk food advertising during programmes aimed at children is a "pathetic compromise between the economic health of broadcasters and the physical health of children", campaigners have warned. The measures, which come into force today, introduce a total ban on junk food advertising in and around all children's programming and on dedicated children's channels, as well as in adult programmes which attract a significantly higher than average proportion of viewers under the age of 16. Content rules will also apply to all food and drink advertising to children irrespective of when it is scheduled and include banning the use of celebrities and characters aimed at primary school children or younger.

But the Children's Food Campaign last night criticised the measures, which they claimed would have no impact on the health of young people.

Campaign coordinator Richard Watts said, "This ban will make little difference to the amount of advertising of junk food children see.

"If the Government is serious about protecting the health of young children, it would introduce a 9pm watershed on advertising.

"These measures still leave the programmes which are most popular with children, like The X Factor, Ant and Dec, and Coronation Street, open to such advertising.

"Banning the adverts won't solve the obesity crisis on its own but we know advertising affects what people buy or advertisers wouldn't do it."

Today's ban follows the ban on similar adverts aimed at children aged four to nine which was introduced on April 1, 2007 and is aimed at improving the health of young people in Britain.

There has been a growing body of research over soaring obesity levels recently - including a leaked Department of Trade and Industry report in July which claimed that half of all primary school aged boys will be obese by 2050 - and government concerns around over-consumption of high fat, salt and sugar (HFSS) foods and the under-consumption of fresh foods, fruit and vegetables. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Junk Food Advertising Ban 'Not Enough' to Help Kids
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.