Naomi, Hugo Chat

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), January 8, 2008 | Go to article overview

Naomi, Hugo Chat


Byline: Robyn-Denise Yourse, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Naomi, Hugo chat

Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez says he likes Prince Charles and thinks President George W. Bush is crazy, in an interview with Naomi Campbell in the British edition of GQ magazine.

The 37-year-old supermodel spoke to Mr. Chavez in her role as contributing editor to British GQ, the magazine said. Excerpts were released yesterday, Associated Press reports.

Mr. Chavez, who lost a referendum last month that would have greatly expanded his powers and institutionalized his version of "21st-century socialism," gave Miss Campbell his views on a range of subjects.

He said President Bush was "completely crazy. But he's on his way out."

Asked to name the world's most stylish leader, Mr. Chavez chose Cuba's Fidel Castro.

The Venezuelan leader also asked Miss Campbell, a British citizen, if she knew Prince Charles.

"I like the prince," he said. "Now he has Camilla, his new girl. She's not as attractive, is she?"

The full interview with Mr. Chavez is in GQ's February issue, due on newsstands Thursday.

Stamp of approval

A commemorative set of James Bond stamps went on sale in Britain to mark 100 years since the birth of Ian Fleming, the superspy's creator.

According to Agence France-Presse, the stamps feature cover designs from six of Mr. Fleming's Bond novels - "Casino Royale," "Diamonds Are Forever," "From Russia With Love," "Dr. No," "Goldfinger" and "For Your Eyes Only - published between 1953 and 1960.

"It is estimated that over half the world's population have heard of James Bond, which is an incredible testament to the imagination of his creator," said Julietta Edgar, the Royal Mail's head of special stamps. …

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