Heartfelt for Life: A New Program Teaches Heart Attack Survivors How to Get Well and Stay Well

By Oz, Mehmet | The Saturday Evening Post, January-February 2008 | Go to article overview

Heartfelt for Life: A New Program Teaches Heart Attack Survivors How to Get Well and Stay Well


Oz, Mehmet, The Saturday Evening Post


Despite all of the advances in medical technology, heart disease remains the leading cause of death for both women and men in the United States. In 2006, nearly one million Americans suffered from a new or recurrent heart attack, known medically as myocardial infarction. Within six years, nearly 20 percent of men and 35 percent of women will have another heart attack. The numbers are staggering, yet they do not have to be. Patients often come to me who think that the bypass operation that I'm going to do will save their life! As proud as I am of what we have accomplished in medicine, ultimately what will drive our longevity and vitality are things that WE can and should do for ourselves. Heart attack survivors can help take their health into their own hands and reduce their chances of another heart attack by controlling their diet, taking their medication, and by exercising. While recommendations are continually modified, here are the basics.

1. Diet: The most valuable heart-healthy diet is one that you can love for the rest of your life. A few simple adjustments can get you started, including consuming omega-3 fatty acids (walnuts, oily fish such as salmon and mackerel, or supplements), lots of leafy greens and other veggies, and 25 grams of fiber (most of us get seven grams). The diet eaten by our distant ancestors can reduce your risk of heart disease, diabetes, and many other illnesses.

2. Medication: Be a smart patient. Pick Dr. Right and take medications as prescribed. The number-one problem in treating many illnesses today is patients' failure to take prescription medications correctly.

3. Exercise: Heart attack survivors sometimes avoid exercise because they feel intimidated or fear they are not healthy enough to participate in physical activities. But with your doctor's approval, most people can and should get moving.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

Conventional medical wisdom on the importance of exercise has shifted dramatically since 1955, when President Eisenhower suffered a heart attack and was prescribed weeks of bedrest. Today's prescription is just the opposite. Within a week after a heart attack, we expect patients to walk around and often prescribe cardiac rehabilitation as part of the optimal recovery.

People who survived a heart attack may be hesitant to exercise for fear that they will have another one. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Heartfelt for Life: A New Program Teaches Heart Attack Survivors How to Get Well and Stay Well
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.