Analysis; Color, Women, Drugs in US Campaign

Manila Bulletin, January 16, 2008 | Go to article overview

Analysis; Color, Women, Drugs in US Campaign


Byline: TONY CZUCZKA Deutsche Presse Agentur

WASHINGTON - Too black for the White House, or not black enough?

The US presidential campaign's latent race issue has erupted into the open as Barack Obama, son of a Kenyan father and a white American mother, seriously challenges former first lady Hillary Clinton for a chance to run for president.

With one of the nation's most emotional topics on the table, the Democratic nomination contest has its most bitter fight yet.

It's no coincidence that the rhetoric is heating up. At stake are black voters, a key Democratic constituency courted by both contenders, and Obama's persona as a post-racial politician who can unite black and white, Republicans and Democrats.

A Clinton remark that critics viewed as belittling martyred civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jr. drew a rebuke Sunday from Obama, who called it "ill-advised." Meanwhile, a black entertainment executive who backs Clinton made an apparent reference to Obama's admitted drug use as a young man.

Obama's supporters charge that the Clinton campaign is playing the race card. She accuses his side of deliberate distortions to fan a black-white confrontation. To complicate matters, former president Bill Clinton, a child of the once-segregated South who is campaigning for his wife, remains popular with African-Americans.

"Obama's campaign has really been about implicitly transcending race," said Peniel Joseph, a professor of black history at Brandeis University. "This is the first African-American candidate who hasn't made explicit appeals for racial solidarity."

That stance is vastly easier in 2008 than in past decades, but it's still a difficult balancing act.

One reason is Obama's perceived lack of street credibility among ageing, 1960s heroes of the US civil rights movement, men and women who often risked their lives fighting for legal equality and integration. In the 1990s, the civil rights establishment provided crucial support to Bill Clinton, sometimes dubbed the first black president.

In a bizarre twist, one civil-rights veteran suggested -- in jest, he insists -- that Hillary Clinton was the better choice for blacks because her husband had "probably gone with more black women than Barack."

But the underlying point by Andrew Young, a Martin Luther King confidant and later UN ambassador, was serious: Obama, 46, is too much of an outsider. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Analysis; Color, Women, Drugs in US Campaign
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.