Is Your Business Getting the Most It Can from You? Management Training & Education

The Journal (Newcastle, England), January 17, 2008 | Go to article overview

Is Your Business Getting the Most It Can from You? Management Training & Education


Byline: By Suzanne McCreedy of Business Link

THE roles and responsibilities of running a business can often leave key managers with little time to think about themselves and the areas in which they could benefit from additional knowledge and training.

Yet their skills are crucial to ensuring their company's success and maintaining its competitive advantage.

Taking a step back from the day-to-day demands of running a business and looking at the way you work can be invaluable to your development and business success.

As a manager you'll be called upon to perform many different roles on a daily basis and you'll naturally be better at some tasks than others.

Running a successful business means being able to access many skills. As your business grows, the range and complexity of skills your business needs will grow too.

On any given day you may find yourself handling issues around finance, sales and marketing or HR and you and your management team need to be able to develop and implement a clear leadership strategy.

Just as with staff training and development, you and your management team need to have the right skills.

Without these key management skills, there is a risk that you may hold the business back and reduce productivity.

Making sure you have the right people with the right skills will ensure your business runs more smoothly.

Taking time to assess where your strengths and weaknesses lie will help you identify where you might benefit from external help.

Businesses don't always recognise the value of external support, yet it can make a big difference to your performance.

With the right information and independent support you can carry out a thorough training needs analysis, enabling you to identify key areas for management development to help the business run more efficiently and ultimately, increase productivity and the bottom line. …

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