As Mugabe Goes Back on the Defensive, Mbeki Faces a Crisis of Credibility

Cape Times (South Africa), January 21, 2008 | Go to article overview

As Mugabe Goes Back on the Defensive, Mbeki Faces a Crisis of Credibility


Zimbabwean President Robert Mugabe appeared until recently to be negotiating in reasonably good faith with the opposition Movement for Democratic Change (MDC) for a new political dispensation.

He made some important concessions, including the scrapping of the 30 appointed Members of Parliament and reforms to the Public Order and Security Act (Posa) and the Access to Information and Protection of Privacy Act (AIPPA), which had given the government undemocratic powers to control political activity and the media respectively.

Then he dug in his heels on other demands from the MDC that are more crucial still - including a new constitution, to be implemented before this year's elections, and a postponement of those elections beyond March to allow all the reforms to take effect.

President Thabo Mbeki, who had been mandated by the Southern African Development Community (SADC) last March to mediate the political negotiations, had largely left the job to his aides. But on Thursday he took personal charge and flew to Harare to meet Mugabe and the MDC leaders to try to break the deadlock.

Mbeki emerged from a five-hour meeting with Mugabe and told reporters; "It's work in progress and very good progress."

But Mbeki was apparently obfuscating, referring to past progress rather than the outstanding issues he had come to Harare to try to resolve.

Because he then apparently went to meet the MDC leaders and told them Mugabe had agreed to none of their demands on the outstanding issues.

It appears Mbeki himself is sympathetic to the MDC demands. That would make sense.

When he returned last March from the SADC meeting in Dar es Salaam where he was given his mediation mission, Mbeki made it clear that his mandate was to help the Zimbabweans agree on "what should be done between now and those elections to create a climate that will be truly free and fair, for an outcome that will not be contested by anybody ..."

This was in an interview with Britain's Financial Times, which his office later referred to as the "official position on Zimbabwe". …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

As Mugabe Goes Back on the Defensive, Mbeki Faces a Crisis of Credibility
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.