Outcomes of Teacher Participation in the Curriculum Development Process

By Saban, Ahmet | Education, Summer 1995 | Go to article overview

Outcomes of Teacher Participation in the Curriculum Development Process


Saban, Ahmet, Education


Introduction

Since the early 1980s, many educators have addressed the negative aspects of schooling in the United States and provided practitioners with various recommendations for how to improve them. According to Sikula (1990), the early reports of 1980s focused on public schooling while the second wave of reports have concentrated more on teacher education. The improvement of the quality of teachers has been viewed as the key to the improvement of the quality of American education.

Troen & Boles (1988) suggest the following three alternative roles for teachers for improving teaching as a profession. teachers as researchers, teachers as trainers of student teachers, and teachers as curriculum writers. McKay's (1992) and Ollmann's (1992) studies provide examples for the first two roles, respectively. For instance, according to McKay, teachers, by participating in individual and/or collaborative action research activities in schools, are able to grow personally and professionally. Similarly, Ollmann's teaming up with a student teacher provided her with the feeling of being able to contribute to the teaching profession and improved the teaching knowledge and skills of the student teacher as well.

The present effort, however, is concerned with the third role, the participation of teachers in the curriculum development process. Based on a review of the related literature, this article discusses the major characteristics and outcomes of teacher participation in the development of school curricula and the critical factors that affect teachers' willingness to be a pan of curriculum committees. The results of the present effort are significant to educational leaders who are concerned with the improvement of curriculum, teaching, and student learning in schools.

Discussion

Characteristics

Historically, although curriculum and instruction have been at the center of school reform movements, they have been treated as separate entities and studied independently from one another (Clandinin & Connelly, 1992). Most educators have made a clear distinction between curriculum as an end and instruction as a means to the end. Curriculum has been conceptualized as a planned course of action for intended learning outcomes while instruction has been referred to as an entity dealing with how a proposed curriculum is put into action. Consequently, teachers were viewed as implementers in their classrooms of externally created curricula and instructional materials that were prescribed for them.

However, teacher participation in the development of school curricula recognizes the connection between the two important systems in the educational structure: curriculum and teaching. It is contended that the link between these two systems can only be established by the provision of a feedback mechanism and that teachers are the group of educators who will be capable of providing this necessary feedback. This is because teachers with their students in the classroom live out the curriculum their lives over time are the curriculum (Clandinin & Connelly, 1992).

Likewise, teacher participation in curriculum development is a matter of taking a position between two ideologies in the educational structure: centralization and decentralization. It simply means that die more school curricula are developed at the district or school level, the more teacher participation will take place. And, this increasingly requires educators to develop a critical understanding of how classroom teachers fit into the process of curriculum development (Haberman, 1992).

Moreover, teacher participation in curriculum development is a matter of raising and dealing with some critical questions in education: Who is responsible for determining what and how students should learn in the school? Should classroom teachers be involved in curriculum development@ If so, What should their roles be? …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Outcomes of Teacher Participation in the Curriculum Development Process
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.