Sequestration, Science, and the Law: An Analysis of the Sequestration Component of the California and Northeastern States' Plans to Curb Global Warming

By Brodeen, Elizabeth C. | Environmental Law, Fall 2007 | Go to article overview

Sequestration, Science, and the Law: An Analysis of the Sequestration Component of the California and Northeastern States' Plans to Curb Global Warming


Brodeen, Elizabeth C., Environmental Law


  I. INTRODUCTION
 II. CARSON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION SCIENCE
     A. Forests:
     B. Agriculture
     C. Carbon Capture and Storage
III. PROGRAMS INVOLVING SEQUESTRATION
     A. The Move Toward State Regulation
     B. California
        1. The CCAR fails to provide sequestration guidelines for
           nonforestry sector entices
        2. The guidelines that the CCAR does provide for sequestration
           underestimate the amount of carbon stored in forests
     C. The Northeastern States
        1. The RGGI cap on carbon sequestration credit may be too
           limiting
 IV. THE INTERSECTION OF SCIENCE AND POLICY: CARBON SEQUESTRATION IN
     CALIFORNIA AND THE NORTHEASTERN STATES
     A. The science supporting the CCAR's and the RGGI's sequestration
        allowances is not the most accurate, however, it is in line
        with the overall policies of each program
     B. The CCAR and the RGGI neglect to provide incentives for members
        to use sequestration methods beyond forests
     C. Incorporating science and policy to create the most effective
        carbon sequestration component
  V. CONCLUSION

I. INTRODUCTION

The impacts of global warning will be extensive and catastrophic. (1) Since 1990, the earth has experienced the ten warmest years ever, thus the effects of global warming are not a future threat but a present one. (2) In fact, global warming is "arguably the most far-reaching and formidable environmental issue facing the world." (3) Largely as a result of human activities in the past 200 years, the atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases (GHG) have increased; for example, carbon dioxide (C[O.sub.2]) has increased by thirty percent. (4) Fossil fuels, which are the energy source the majority of the world's population depends upon, are the chief source of GHG emissions. (5) Although future energy demands are uncertain, rising human population and growing development ensure the continued increase of GHG emissions. (6) In order to stave off the effects of global warming, it is imperative for governments to develop laws and regulations limiting GHG emissions. Understanding the science behind global warming "is fundamental to determining the appropriate policy response." (7)

As the science surrounding global warming becomes more concrete, governments around the world are actively attempting to control factors that contribute to climate change. Since the increases in C[O.sub.2] are primarily attributable to fossil fuel emissions, it is one of the major components that climate change laws seek to control. The ultimate goal for these programs is to stabilize GHG emissions from human activities; since it is almost impossible that these emissions will ever be zero, this goal demands that GHG emissions be offset by methods that remove an equal amount of atmospheric GHG. (8) One process that achieves this offsetting purpose is carbon sequestration. The majority of programs, laws, and protocols designed to limit the effects of climate change include a carbon sequestration component. (9)

Sequestration of carbon has been called "the only credible option that would allow the continued use of fossil energy without the threat of dangerously altering Earth's climate system." (10) In 2004, sequestration of carbon in the United States offset approximately eleven percent of U.S. GHG emissions. (11) Since the switch from fossil fuel energy sources to alternative energy sources will not happen overnight, sequestration is crucial. (12) Critics of sequestration offsets in climate change laws argue that any credit allowed for sequestration "justifies a carbon emission that would otherwise not have occurred because it would have put the user of fossil fuels over its emission allowance." (13) While it is true that reductions are the ultimate goal when confronting global warming, it is imperative to have other options that decrease the amount of GHG in the atmosphere because it is unlikely that fossil fuels, for example coal, will ever cease to be used as an energy source. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Sequestration, Science, and the Law: An Analysis of the Sequestration Component of the California and Northeastern States' Plans to Curb Global Warming
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.