Whistle-Blowing

Manila Bulletin, February 16, 2008 | Go to article overview

Whistle-Blowing


Byline: HERN P. ZENAROSA

WHISTLE-BLOWING happens when a member of a group discovers a wrong within the organization and exposes it. Often, a whistle-blower feels sure he is acting in an ethical manner and may even be thanked for his effort and solicitude.

A study shows that a corrupt system can happen only if the individuals who make up that system are corrupt; that you are either going to be part of the corruption or part of the forces working against it.

There is no third choice.

In fact, the risks are high: The whistle-blower could be ostracized and publicly labeled a trouble-maker, aside from the stress that could cause ill-health, career loss, dislocation, unemployment, and financial ruin.

It could also result in the loss of friends and worse, a broken family life.

All this, even when the evidence is very much in the whistle-blower's favor. And this could be the reason in many instances when more "practical" people would caution would-be whistle-blowers to "forget it" or be prepared for the consequences.

The question really is whether speaking out - as in the case of the current case of the notorious national broadband network controversy - is, in fact, in the public interest.

Already, the exposes made by whistle-blower Rodolfo Lozada Jr. have been causing commotion that could seriously disturb the national peace situation.

Aside from its readiness to provide Lozano free legal assistance, the Kilosbayan and Bantay Katarungan of former Senate President Jovito R. …

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