Period Designs: Gothic; in Part Two of Our Ongoing Style Series, Interior Designer Andy Bradshaw Explores the Gothic Period

Western Mail (Cardiff, Wales), February 16, 2008 | Go to article overview

Period Designs: Gothic; in Part Two of Our Ongoing Style Series, Interior Designer Andy Bradshaw Explores the Gothic Period


History

Although Gothic was first seen as an architectural style throughout the Middle Ages, it's the revival during the mid 19th century that is probably the most familiar.

The revival was a reaction by the Victorians against the classical styles of the Georgian and Regency era that had preceded it.

A nouveau riche generation was born from the new industrialisation, and they wanted something that would demonstrate this new-found wealth and give them a feeling of grandeur and importance.

Key elements

Highly decorated with images taken from medieval and ecclesiastical architecture, the Gothic style embraced the ideals of chivalry and romanticism.

Influential figures of this time include Sir Walter Scott, whose prolific work included Ivanhoe and Rob Roy, John Ruskin, the art critic and writer, and, of course, closer to home William Burgess, whose wonderful legacy of Cardiff Castle, with its rich colours and ornamentation, and Castell Coch, has delighted many visitors to the city.

Get the look

One of the most repeated forms to give instant effect is the Gothic arch. Use it in alcoves to create decorative niches.

If you are lucky enough to have exposed beams then you are half way there. The Victorians were happy to add faux beams to create the look, although I do feel that you can end up with a look that smacks of ye olde bogus inn.

Colours were rich, so look for accents in deep greens and reds. Good choices are the Little Greene Paint Company's Olive colour and Bronze Red contrasted with Orchard Pink and Sienna Earth from Fired Earth. Keep the rest of the colour fairly neutral to emulate stone. Splashes of gold are a must but these can be added through candlesticks or other ornamentation.

Wallpaper is also a great way to get the look.

Cole and Son has been making wallpaper since 1873 and has the original blocks for many papers of this period. Laurence Llewelyn-Bowen has also launched a range for Graham and Brown inspired by this period - use sparingly.

If your room will take a fireplace then go large.

Chesney is the top dog in this field, although many of the DIY stores now offer pretty good, and perhaps more affordable, copies.

Flooring should be hard, preferably flagstones, so it's possibly a good idea to invest in some under floor heating. Pale stone that has a worn and weathered look or, alternatively, stain floorboards in a dark finish or lay laminate in dark oak. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Period Designs: Gothic; in Part Two of Our Ongoing Style Series, Interior Designer Andy Bradshaw Explores the Gothic Period
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.