Software for Planning Curricula

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), February 18, 2008 | Go to article overview

Software for Planning Curricula


Byline: Kate Tsubata, SPECIAL TO THE WASHINGTON TIMES

One of the advantages of this electronic age is the widespread access to information and tools that previously were available only to the well-funded few. This has been true in education; large institutional schools could purchase lab equipment, computers and learning software and have the latest athletic facilities.

Home-schoolers often were daunted by their inability to provide their children with a similar level of infrastructure and support.

In the same way, while professional teachers receive extensive education in lesson planning and curricula, most parents must figure it out for themselves. Now, a planning tool that professional educators have been using for more than two decades is available to parents - and at a very reasonable price.

"The Goal Mine," a book and software package, provides educators with menus of specific learning goals and objectives for academic, social and physical development. From these, parents can create a learning "to do" list for each of their children, incorporating the unique needs of each.

These individual educational plans can be used as your learning framework for a year or any learning period. Chapters on tests and their usefulness (or lack thereof) help demystify many educational buzzwords, giving parents practical advice on how actual progress can be measured.

The workhorse of the "Goal Mine" package is the software - formerly sold only to school systems or licensed to individual teachers.

This CD-based program enables you to create a specific and unique learning plan for each child, personalized and using "his" or "her" appropriate to that child's gender.

You are not limited to using the menu of more than 6,000 learning targets. You and your child can create new ones specific to your family learning goals. If you want to teach fractions by having the child multiply a recipe involving various fractional measurements, for example, you can insert that text into your list of objectives.

What's nice about "The Goal Mine" is the flexibility. …

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