Foster Care: Are There Differences in the Cognitive and Psychiatric Characteristics of Young Children with Developmental Disabilities in Kinship vs. Non-Kinship Homes?

By Valicenti-McDermott, Maria; Demb, Howard B. | Mental Health Aspects of Developmental Disabilities, January-March 2008 | Go to article overview

Foster Care: Are There Differences in the Cognitive and Psychiatric Characteristics of Young Children with Developmental Disabilities in Kinship vs. Non-Kinship Homes?


Valicenti-McDermott, Maria, Demb, Howard B., Mental Health Aspects of Developmental Disabilities


This study compares developmental, psychiatric diagnosis and global assessment of functioning of 82 young foster children who present for evaluation of a developmental disability from kinship and non-kinship homes. The children in kinship homes (n=42) had been with their foster parents longer (3.2 yrs. vs. 1.2 yrs. p<0.001) before being referred for evaluation. There were no significant differences regarding types of developmental disabilities, psychiatric diagnosis or global assessment of functioning between the groups. There was a wide spectrum of psychiatric disorders. Children with developmental disabilities in kinship homes may be as emotionally and developmentally involved as children in non-kinship homes.

Keywords: intellectual disability, foster care, children, psychiatric disorder, mental retardation

**********

According to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services in 2001, more than 800,000 children spent some time in the out-of-home care, including family foster care, group homes, and institutions, with approximately 547,000 children in family foster care (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 2003a). In 1980 the total number of children in foster care was 300,000, while in 2001 290,000 children entered de novo out of home care, (1,46) Children are placed into foster care at an average age of 5 years and are most often placed because of complications arising out of parental drug and/or alcohol abuse or serious mental illness of mothers. (1,8,19,24,30,34,36,43) Studies show that 23% (10) to 60% (39,42) of children in foster care have developmental problems such as speech/language delay, motor delay or an intellectual disability. They are 3 to 10 times more likely to receive a mental health diagnosis, have 6.5 times more mental health claims, are 7.5 times more likely to be hospitalized for a mental health condition, and have mental health expenditures 11.5 times greater than children in the Aid to Families With Dependent Children program. (23) With regard to specific mental health and educational issues, children in foster care are more likely to suffer from depression, anxiety disorders, attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder, conduct disorder, bipolar disorder, oppositional defiant disorder and substance abuse than children in the general population. (11,16,21,22,23,29,31,35,37,39) In addition, nearly 60% (43) to 80% (22) of children in foster care have at least one chronic health condition and 25% have three or more chronic problems, three to seven times the rate found among other children living in poverty. (22)

The placement with kin (24) (any relative, by blood or marriage, or any person with close family ties) has been a historical reality in the informal placement of children. The percentage of children in the care of relatives (kinship foster care) increased from 18% in 1986 to 31% in 1990. (20) In New York City almost half of the approximately 50,000 foster children have been placed with relatives. (17,19)

But, while kinship care has increasingly become a preferred placement for children entering out-of-home care, with many public agencies giving priority to relatives when children must be formally placed in out-of-home care, the literature on kinship foster care is sparse, with most of the research limited to regional samples. The presumed advantages of kinship care include continuity of family identity, access to other relatives, an ongoing life within the ethnic, religious, and racial community of origin, being (40) less likely to experience multiple placements, and being more likely to be placed with siblings than children in non-kinship care. (8,15,40)

Few studies compared the emotional and developmental characteristics of children in kinship vs. non-kinship homes, (7) but of those, children placed with non-relatives seemed to have more developmental and behavioral (7) problems, (7,11,25,27,28,32,44) and were more likely to have repeated at least one grade or be enrolled in Special Education. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Foster Care: Are There Differences in the Cognitive and Psychiatric Characteristics of Young Children with Developmental Disabilities in Kinship vs. Non-Kinship Homes?
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.