So You Want to Know Something about Oregon, or Maybe You Want to Know Everything about Oregon, What Do You Do?

The Register Guard (Eugene, OR), February 10, 2008 | Go to article overview

So You Want to Know Something about Oregon, or Maybe You Want to Know Everything about Oregon, What Do You Do?


Byline: Mark Baker The Register-Guard

So you want to know something about Oregon, or maybe you want to know everything about Oregon, what do you do?

Where do you turn?

You could check out the World Book Encyclopedia and discover that we're "The Beaver State," that the Western meadowlark is the state bird, the Oregon grape is the state flower and the Douglas fir is the state tree, but you already knew all that, didn't you?

Maybe.

But what this state really needs, in this day and age, are not pages to turn, but something to click on. With that, a joint project of Portland State University and the Oregon Historical Society hopes you'll go to www.oregonencyclopedia.org now and in the future.

"There's a lot of planning going on right now about what this is going to look like when it gets rolled out," says James Fox, director of the Special Collections and University Archives at the University of Oregon's Knight Library, and one of 22 members of the Oregon Encyclopedia Project's editorial board. Yes, the Oregon Encyclopedia Project is already under way, even if its official launch comes Thursday - Valentine's Day and the state's 149th birthday - during an event at the Oregon Historical Society in Portland. It's all about getting the project ready for the state's big birthday, its sesquicentennial, next year.

And who's going to put this thing together? We are.

That's the great thing about it, the public will make contributions, tell their stories, says Fox, who will review entries and also write some himself.

The main goal is to produce an online encyclopedia of "people, places and events" that make up Oregon's history, not just for 2009, but deep into the future, says Bill Lang, a PSU history professor and one of the project's three editors.

The hope is that it will be nothing like Wikipedia, but more like a traditional encyclopedia based on verified facts, with one important difference: It'll have stuff no one knows about. Yet.

"And this is where, I think, our ambition is the greatest," Lang says.

A project team plans to visit with about 30 communities in Oregon during the next year - starting with Coos Bay in March and Madras in April - to begin culling stories, Lang says. "And we hope that the totality of these community meetings will do two things," he says. "One, make us aware of what's important about their places, and two, that residents will put their own energies into some of the entries."

The project also plans to produce a printed version in 2010, he says.

What was Vortex?

Oregon's online encyclopedia will hope to answer such questions as: Where did the name Oregon come from? When did northern Oregon become the state of Washington? When did Mount Mazama last erupt? Why and how did Russian immigrants come to Oregon? And what was Vortex?

Intrigued, aren't you?

But it won't just be updated every few years like a traditional encyclopedia you'd find on your shelf. It'll be updated and revised continuously, Lang says. "We are looking at the encyclopedia project as dynamic and organic," he says.

In addition to PSU and the Oregon Historical Society, the Oregon Cultural Trust, a public-private partnership that supports the state's cultural resources, and the Oregon Council of Teachers of English, which promotes research in the study and teaching of English language arts, are sponsoring the project.

Go to the Web site now, and you won't find much. Click on "Browse entries" and you'll find a few things listed from A to Z. This is the extent of the contributions so far. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

So You Want to Know Something about Oregon, or Maybe You Want to Know Everything about Oregon, What Do You Do?
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.