Cultivating Leadership for Tomorrow's Schools of Education: What Does It Take to Convince an Education Professor with Leadership Potential to Seriously Consider Becoming a Dean? Mr. Hartley and Mr. Kecskemethy Highlight What Was Learned at a Conference Where Deans and Mid-Career Faculty Members Discussed Ways to Tap and Prepare Future Leaders

By Hartley, Matt; Kecskemethy, Tom. | Phi Delta Kappan, February 2008 | Go to article overview

Cultivating Leadership for Tomorrow's Schools of Education: What Does It Take to Convince an Education Professor with Leadership Potential to Seriously Consider Becoming a Dean? Mr. Hartley and Mr. Kecskemethy Highlight What Was Learned at a Conference Where Deans and Mid-Career Faculty Members Discussed Ways to Tap and Prepare Future Leaders


Hartley, Matt, Kecskemethy, Tom., Phi Delta Kappan


SCHOOLS OF education are at a crossroads. David Labaree argues in The Trouble with Ed Schools (hardly an encouraging title) that their predicament stems in part from the historically low status of the teaching profession. Furthermore, measuring the impact of teacher preparation--a central activity of these education schools--is a fantastically difficult proposition, which leaves the schools vulnerable to accusations, fair or otherwise, of poor instruction. (1) In the research arena, they fare no better. Society would dearly love ed schools to discover the alchemical blend of policies and practices needed to "fix" our education system. But it is an elusive task. The problems are systemic, highly complex, and seemingly intractable. Given these circumstances, solutions advanced by educational researchers are often, by necessity, context-bound and conditional. As Labaree ruefully notes, "If Sisyphus were a scholar, his field would be education." (2)

However, many ed schools are grappling with key educational issues--improving teacher preparation, cultivating educational leadership, closing the achievement gap, defining the role of education in a deliberative democracy--and they have significant strengths important insights into the connections between pedagogy and policy. Professors of education tend to have a strong interdisciplinary bent and considerable experience working across methodological lines and epistemological traditions. Ed schools also serve as the professional gateways through which the vast majority of U.S. teachers and school administrators pass.

Despite these strengths, the efficacy of ed schools has been regularly questioned and increasingly so in recent years. George Will, for example, has rather dramatically called for the closure of all schools of education, claiming that their curricula are wholly "vacuous" and inordinately bound to progressivist ideology. (3) More measured criticism has come from within the academy as well, the latest salvos being three sobering reports from Arthur Levine that recommended (among other things) the closure of a healthy number of teacher preparation programs and the abolition of the doctor of education degree.

Jerome Murphy, a former dean of Harvard's Graduate School of Education, fears that, despite this clamor for change, the mounting pressure on ed schools still may be insufficient to spur widespread reform. (4) That said, he sees this as a propitious time for some schools to look anew at their service to the field. Murphy urges ed schools to become places where faculty and practitioners collaborate to fashion curricula aimed at preparing teachers and administrators to address pressing contemporary problems. He calls for research of greater analytic sophistication and richer insight, as well as interventions that are a part of an expansive agenda born out of long-standing partnerships. However, Murphy argues that such change cannot occur without bold thinking and that academic leadership is a principal part of the equation. And "significant change," he stresses, "would require the leadership of Ed School deans." (5)

Developing that sort of leadership cannot be left to chance. Yet many individuals with the capacity to become effective deans never entertain the possibility. How then can ed schools foster future leaders? This question inspired a group of 11 education school deans to ponder how they might play a role in cultivating future leaders for ed schools themselves. The group was originally drawn together through the Spencer Foundation's Research Training Grant (RTG) program, a pre-dissertation fellowship program aimed at improving training for doctoral students in schools of education. The deans caucused regularly, discussing issues such as practitioner preparation, advances in research, and the improvement of doctoral training. They also discussed the challenges and responsibilities of ed schools in an era of tumultuous reform. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Cultivating Leadership for Tomorrow's Schools of Education: What Does It Take to Convince an Education Professor with Leadership Potential to Seriously Consider Becoming a Dean? Mr. Hartley and Mr. Kecskemethy Highlight What Was Learned at a Conference Where Deans and Mid-Career Faculty Members Discussed Ways to Tap and Prepare Future Leaders
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.