Stage Coach Troubles

Alberta History, Winter 2008 | Go to article overview

Stage Coach Troubles


Steele, the driver on the Calgary end of the stage line, has had an extremely bad run of luck, and feels it very keenly. It's a long lane, however, that has no turning, and we venture to say that the turning place has come in Steele's lane. He has now got everything straightened out, and it is very improbable that he will have any further trouble. The accidents have been such as any driver might have experienced, and were not the fault of Steele, who is both a good and careful driver, and steers the big wagon as well as anyone could desire.

The first upset was at Fish Creek, on the trip south. The old channel there is badly washed out, and the new crossing is further up. There is a bad mud-hole on the north side, with a sidling descent, and it was here that the coach went over.

At Sheep Creek, the second accident occurred on the trip north, the driver being alone. He had crossed there before with the water quite as high, but this time the wheel struck on a big rock, and the rapid current threw the coach on its side. Steele gallantly stayed with the coach. The leaders had a foothold on the bar, and with his feet braced against the lower rails of the driving seat, Steele tried to make them pull it out. …

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