Sex Trafficking: The Global Market in Women and Children

By Desyllas, Moshoula Capous | Journal of International Women's Studies, May 2007 | Go to article overview

Sex Trafficking: The Global Market in Women and Children


Desyllas, Moshoula Capous, Journal of International Women's Studies


Sex trafficking: The global market in women and children. Kathryn Farr. 2005. New York: Worth Publishers. pp.262, ISBN:0-7167-5548-3, US $24.95 (Paperback).

Sex trafficking has gained considerable media attention over the past few years. The purpose of this book, as stated by the author, is to "spread the word about the trafficking industry--its sources, operations and structures" (preface). The lens from which sex trafficking is perceived and understood in this book fits a radical feminist perspective; the notion that women's oppression is due to worldwide patriarchy. Farr states that her lens of viewing the sources of sex trafficking is "economic and patriarchal" (preface). She describes sex trafficking as a structured form of violence, and throughout this book presents its sources, operations and configurations. The book's main focus is to look at the process and the industry of sex trafficking from a radical feminist perspective.

I position myself within this book review as an ally of the non-dominant perspective of sex trafficking, not evidenced in the media and in national trafficking policy. Trafficking is a phenomenon that seems unable to escape its historical association with prostitution and migration control. My understanding of trafficking is "not as the enslavement of women, but as the trade and exploitation of labor under conditions of coercion and force" (Kempadoo, 2005, viii). This perspective addresses trafficking as transnational migration of labor with a focus on the unsafe working conditions of migrants and their fights as humans. This feminist lens is different from that of this book, in that more weight is given to the voices of women from developing countries as opposed to the influence of Western media regarding the phenomenon of sex trafficking. It is crucial to note that Farr acknowledges the view of sex trafficking in the context of transnational migration of labor into the sex industry (or migrant sex work) that can involve abuses, but her perspective represents the abolitionist stance towards the issue of sex trafficking. This perspective maintains that any type of prostitution is slavery and thus, considered violence against women. While this perspective takes an abolitionist stance toward prostitution, from this lens, many of the complexities of trafficking into the sex industry are placed aside and assumptions are made about women of developing countries who are cast as victims of violence that need to be saved. Casting women as victims of sex trafficking while turning to the state to protect these women and prosecute 'evil' criminal organizations, can be dangerous. This stance often results in harming, rather than helping, migrant women who find themselves in violent and abusive labor conditions. When reading this book, it is important to consider alternative frameworks for understanding trafficking into the sex industry, while appreciating Farr's thorough research that has been analyzed and presented through her particular lens.

The topic of sex trafficking is well-researched and very organized in this book. The phenomenon of sex trafficking is structured into sections that describe the process of sex trafficking as well as other forms of violence against women. In chapter one, Farr notes the "increasingly high volume and wide scope of sex trafficking industry" referring to the movement of people from "sending countries" to "receiving countries" (12). Farr claims that the fastest growing sending region--the former USSR--serves as a context for the supply side of trafficking. While the magnitude of sex trafficking has received media attention, recent reports and studies have questioned the numbers reported by the U.S. Department of State and others who provide such statistics but do not explain how these statistics were collected. The fact that the sex industry is a hidden economy illuminates the reality that statistics on the number of individuals who are trafficked into the sex industry are very difficult to gather. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Sex Trafficking: The Global Market in Women and Children
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.