Blogging the Oscars: The Carpetbagger Reports

Editor & Publisher, February 25, 2008 | Go to article overview

Blogging the Oscars: The Carpetbagger Reports


E&P was too lazy to blog the Academy Awards ceremony this year -- we'll just say it moved along well and Jon Stewart was okay but not zingy -- so we will take the easy way out and just quote a few nuggets from David Carr at his Carpetbagger blog at www.nytimes.com*

Each year, four acting slots come up for grabs. European actors frequently are part of the mix, but they never have walked away with four. Taking cultural hegemony to a new tier, Hollywood mostly stood by. And even the guys who won picture and director, are about as far as you can get from Hollywood guys. The industry rewarded itself, except it was a lot of folks who ain't exactly industry.

*Glen Hansard showed up on the red carpet with his beat-up guitar on one arm and his professional and personal partner Marketa Irglova on the other.For two people who busked while they worked on "Once," they've done okay for themselves, including just winning best song. They took it as a sign that a couple of weeks ago, they were eating in a restaurant and noticed that they were sitting in by Melissa Ethridge, the winner of best song last year. "You'll be fine," she told them. …

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