Democracy vs. Survival: With Membership Down and the Organization in Debt, Women in Communications' Leadership Suspends Board Elections - Much to the Dismay of a Segment of Its Membership

By Giobbe, Dorothy | Editor & Publisher, September 30, 1995 | Go to article overview

Democracy vs. Survival: With Membership Down and the Organization in Debt, Women in Communications' Leadership Suspends Board Elections - Much to the Dismay of a Segment of Its Membership


Giobbe, Dorothy, Editor & Publisher


MEMBERS OF ONE of the oldest professional women's associations charge that the group has been hijacked by a small leadership contingent which is circumventing the authority of the membership.

As Women In Communications Inc. (WICI) prepares to gather for its annual convention and business meeting in October, questions are swirling about the direction and long-term viability of the 86-year-old association.

Within WICI, there is broad consensus on the need for sweeping organizational change. Currently, membership hovers around 8,000 and the group is $30,000 in debt. During its 1980s heyday, WICI had a national membership close to 13,000 and a reserve fund of over $100,000.

While the need for a revamped strategic direction generally is acknowledged, members differ on the means. Drastic times call for drastic measures, argue some. Others worry that the organization is sacrificing democratic process in the name of expediency.

In a particularly controversial move, a 40-member task force recommended that WICI suspend Fall 1995 elections for four national board seats. The measure was approved by the WICI board of directors without a vote from the general membership, even though the national elections are mandated in WICI's bylaws.

Christy Bulkeley, chair of the task force, a former WICI president and a Gannett publisher, said that timely reform is difficult in a membership body of 8,000.

"The organization, in its current configuration, has lost some sense of its identity," Bulkeley said. "I don't have any answers for those who criticize suspending the elections. Sure, it's a tough, radical action, but we could not see any other way of making clear the necessity of change and intent to move forward rapidly."

WICI president Carol Fenstermacher said she has heard from a number of members, some of whom agree with the suspension policy and some who oppose the move.

"We knew it wouldn't be totally popular, but that's not what we were in it for," she said. "Sometimes, you try to make a change and it becomes a very personal thing. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Democracy vs. Survival: With Membership Down and the Organization in Debt, Women in Communications' Leadership Suspends Board Elections - Much to the Dismay of a Segment of Its Membership
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.