The Last Execution; the Hangman: Albert Pierrepoint and Robert McGladdery

Daily Mail (London), March 11, 2008 | Go to article overview

The Last Execution; the Hangman: Albert Pierrepoint and Robert McGladdery


Byline: CHARLES LEGGE

QUESTIONWho was the last person hanged in Ireland?

MICHAEL MANNING was the last man to go to the gallows in the Republic in 1954.

A Limerick labourer, he was just 25 when he was hanged for the murder ofCatherine Cooper, a 65-year-old nurse who worked at Barringtons Hospital in thetown.

The last man to be hanged in the north was 25-year-old agricultural workerRobert McGladdery in 1961 for the murder of 19-year-old shop assistant PearlGamble.

Pearl was found strangled and stabbed in a field near her home in Newry afterattending a dance at her local Orange Hall.

During the Civil War, the new government executed 75 of their enemies by firingsquad.

Between the end of the war and Manning's execution in 1954, a total of 35people had been hanged, including one female, Annie Walsh from Co. Limerick,who was executed in 1925 for the murder of her husband.

One legacy of British rule that remained after independence was that itsofficial hangman still carried out executions here as no one on this islandwould do the job.

The infamous executioner Albert Pierrepoint sent Manning to his Maker and alsoflicked the switch for three previous hangings in 1945, 1947 and 1948.

In all, Pierrepoint may have carried out 500 executions in his career,including the hanging of 200 Nazis which made him something of a celebrity inhis home country.

The son of a hangman, Albert followed him into the profession against thewishes of his mother and attended his first execution, at Mountjoy Jail as anassistant to his uncle.

The death penalty here was abolished in 1964 for all but the murder of gardai,diplomats and prison officers. It was finally removed from the statute book in1990.

John Reilly, Limerick.

QUESTION How did medieval food and drink differ from todays?

THE variety of food and drink was surprisingly varied in the Middle Ages.Grain-based food was particularly popular but by the 14th century, when livingstandards were risingespecially in the Dublin area meat and fish became much more popular.

Historical records from the 14th century tell us that labourers bringing in theharvest at Holy Trinity monastery at Clonkeen, Co. Dublin, ate wheaten breadwith ale brewed from oat malt.

The monks fare was better stillmeat and herringwhile no expense was spared when the prior visited, with mutton, geese and wineall laid on in vast quantities.

The common mans diet would be considered healthy today. Pottage, made fromwheat, other grains, beans and peas, was a staple, along with cheese and milk.

In general, our medieval predecessors ate a much wider range of animals, fishand birds than we do.

Excavations of medieval Dublin have turned up a walrus in Temple Bar and adolphin and porpoise on Arran Quay.

Then as now, how well people ate depended on their income and social status.

The better-off enjoyed such delicacies as oystersvery popular during Lent salmon and trout, as well as figs and spices.

Ale was drunk across the board, as was milk and water, but only the well-offtook wine, which came from Bordeaux.

It was as well that folk in the Middle Ages enjoyed their food and drink. Lifeexpectancy was low, with the average age for men only 25 and women just 20. Itwas exceptional for people to live to 45.

Those living in the country were generally healthier than townsfolk.

Garret OSullivan, Dublin.

QUESTION The tail flukes of the whale family are horizontal, while those of thefishes are vertical. Is there any biological reason for this, and which is themost efficient method of propulsion?

THREE major groups of mammals have returned to the ways of their ancestors byreturning to the sea: the Sirenia (dugongs and manatees), the Cetacea (whalesand dolphins) and the Pinnepedia (seals, sea lions, and walruses). …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

The Last Execution; the Hangman: Albert Pierrepoint and Robert McGladdery
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.