The Royal Treatment: The DA Products Blog Offers Insider Views and Opinions

By Dyrli, Odvard Egil | District Administration, March 2008 | Go to article overview

The Royal Treatment: The DA Products Blog Offers Insider Views and Opinions


Dyrli, Odvard Egil, District Administration


I have been fascinated by the unvarnished thoughts, insights and grassroots power expressed through Web logs, or blogs, since they first arrived online. My favorites include Engadget, on breaking technologies; TechCrunch, on Internet products; and The Huffington Post, on politics. Blogs have become significant sources of information on almost any subject, and your staff and students need to know their way around the blogosphere.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

In K12 education, readers regularly access the often-controversial opinions in our DA blog, The Pulse, edited by Gary Stager and featuring contributors such as Yvonne Andres, Bruce Dixon, Ken Goodman, Alfie Kohn, Etta Kralovec and Susan Ohanian. For example, posts that recently caught my eye claim that that Teach for America is "more like Enron than Google," that standardized tests prompt students to read less for fun, and that court decisions have returned us to "legally sanctioned segregation."

A Royal Blog

I am therefore pleased to announce the launch of a unique new blog dedicated to the complex world of K12 products from our DA editor Ken Royal, who reviews products each month for both the magazine and the Web site and directs the annual Readers' Choice Top 100 Awards. Appropriately rifled The Royal Treatment, Ken's new blog is a labor of love, which he writes largely on his own time and in which he shares insights from his decades of experience at all levels and content areas of public education. …

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