How Tutoring Fares against NCLB: Researchers and Analysts Caution against Adopting a One-Size-Fits-All Approach

By McClure, Carla Thomas | District Administration, March 2008 | Go to article overview

How Tutoring Fares against NCLB: Researchers and Analysts Caution against Adopting a One-Size-Fits-All Approach


McClure, Carla Thomas, District Administration


UNDER THE NO CHILD LEFT Behind act, districts receiving Title I funds are required to offer free tutoring and other supplemental educational services to students from low-income families who attend a Title I school that has not achieved Adequate Yearly Progress for at least three years. District personnel may be asked to help parents select a provider from a state-approved list. They may also be asked what the research says about tutoring as an intervention strategy. Although high-quality research on this topic is limited, available studies provide useful insights and caveats.

Tutoring under NCLB

In the summer of 2007, RAND released the first federally funded evaluation of school choice and supplemental educational services under NCLB. After examining data from nine large urban districts, RAND researchers concluded that tutoring had "a positive influence on reading and math scores in five of the seven districts where there were enough students to examine effects." Although academic gains were small during the first year, they increased after students received a second year of tutoring, indicating a positive cumulative effect. Comparisons of commercial tutoring services versus district-operated tutoring programs yielded mixed results as to which was better at producing academic gains. Meanwhile, students who elected transfer to better performing schools over tutoring showed no significant improvement in test scores, although researchers cautioned that these findings should not be viewed as nationally representative.

Only weeks before RAND released its report, Patricia Burch, a policy analyst at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, described the evidence base for tutoring and other supplemental education service provisions as "quite limited." She cited two important district-level studies of how these NCLB services affected student performance--one in Minneapolis and another in Chicago--but deemed them "methodologically inadequate" for the purpose of making broad policy recommendations in districts.

Two other districts (Los Angeles Unified School District and Pittsburgh Public Schools) as well as three states (Georgia, New Mexico and Tennessee) have also examined the relationship between tutoring and student achievement. The verdict: In general, tutoring doesn't seem to hurt, and sometimes it can help, with some students posting small gains on state reading and math exams.

Inadequate state and district resources for monitoring providers, implementation and results may help explain why the research base on NCLB tutoring remains small (Sunderman, 2007).

Findings from Other Studies

Tutoring can be delivered in a variety of ways (e.g., in small groups or one-on one) and circumstances (at the school or in other settings). Several studies have shown that tutoring can help low-achieving students improve their academic performance (e.g., Elbaum et al., 2000). In 2004, researchers at McREL examined 20 years of research on the effectiveness of out-of-school-time strategies in assisting low-achieving students in reading and mathematics. …

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