Industrial Arts; Masterpieces Made from Scrap

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), April 4, 2008 | Go to article overview

Industrial Arts; Masterpieces Made from Scrap


Byline: Sterling Meyers, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

University of Maryland professor John Ruppert presented his art students with blowtorches, scrap metal and giant molds - supplies to create sculptures sometimes too big and too earthy for the indoors. Mr. Ruppert and the other artists wore leather bibs, plastic helmets and face shields while pouring molten metal into molds on Saturday. "We all look like evil warriors," he said.

He told these "industrial" artists: "If anyone wants to participate in the iron pour, they have to come with their own iron."

Students brought broken radiators and other scraps on campus to shovel into furnaces that are fueled by processed coal and reach temperatures of 3200 degrees.

Once a semester, Mr. Ruppert and professor Steve Jones bring together students, professors and enthusiasts to pool their talents.

"It takes a lot of human effort," Mr. Ruppert said. "It's a community-building event because everyone works together."

He said the group poured 20 to 30 molds weighing from 10 to 1,000 pounds. Almost 60 spectators and participants were at the sculpture yard during the daylong event.

Mr. Ruppert, chairman of the university's art department, and students in his metal-casting class prepared a week in advance. The students learn to build molds out of sand and to cast objects from materials such as aluminum, bronze, iron and copper.

Artists occasionally break out a piece of the mold and are surprised with the hardened result, Mr. Ruppert said. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Industrial Arts; Masterpieces Made from Scrap
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.