Mathematics through Movement: An Investigation of the Links between Kinaesthetic and Conceptual Learning: Karen Wood Describes How She Used Dance and Movement to Engage Students in Mathematical Investigations

By Wood, Karen | Australian Primary Mathematics Classroom, Spring 2008 | Go to article overview

Mathematics through Movement: An Investigation of the Links between Kinaesthetic and Conceptual Learning: Karen Wood Describes How She Used Dance and Movement to Engage Students in Mathematical Investigations


Wood, Karen, Australian Primary Mathematics Classroom


Developing strategies for engaging mathematics activities is always a challenge. Teachers seek out new resources and online activities to excite students and support their learning. Mathematics through Movement offers an active learning strategy requiring few resources, and a bit of imagination, to achieve a variety of outcomes across mathematics domains. It is based on sound educational theory and a life time of experience in dance. This paper examines the beginnings of research into this teaching strategy in a remote setting in Western Australia. It shows that this teaching tool can motivate talk, deepen understandings, and engage students in mathematics tasks.

Background

As a dancer, teacher of dance and mother, I had often reflected upon the significant role movement had in my life and that of my daughters. Dancers, dance teachers and parents had often commented that dance, callisthenics or movement of some sort, had supported students in their

school work. As a teacher I pondered on Gardner's kinesthetic learner and I am drawn to his statement: "Indeed participation in the arts is so natural and integral a part of human growth that an understanding of this process should provide important clues to many pivotal questions of human development," (Gardner, 1973, p. 23).

Observation of my classroom in northern Western Australia, in a small rural town, showed that students were more engaged with ideas and learning if there was an element of movement involved. Many seemed to be kinaesthetic learners. This prompted the use of interactive technology but also a deeper investigation of how I could use my understanding of movement to enhance some core mathematical concepts. The links seemed obvious in my mind but could I show a direct educational benefit for integration of dance with specific mathematics foci?

Informal action research was undertaken in my classroom and anecdotal notes, video recordings and reflective journal entries gathered. The data were showing that some core mathematical concepts could be clarified and new ideas scaffolded using movement, especially in the Shape domain. This raised questions regarding how effective dance might be in supporting learning in the other mathematics domains, (Number, Measurement, Chance and Data). A program of learning was devised with dance as the core strategy that addressed all mathematics domains and their links to movement (see Figure 1).

This paper will discuss the findings of that informal research, the testing of the initial outcomes in a new classroom with students with different learning styles and socioeconomic backgrounds, and further developments that were derived from the program outlined in Figure 1.

Findings

The following data were derived from observing students in a K-3 cohort of predominately indigenous Australian decent, around 25-27 students at any time, in a small remote township in Western Australia. During 2006, mathematics concepts were integrated into the classroom program using the following outlined in Figure 2.

The results from using the above strategies will be discussed using the categories, Engagement, Deeper Understandings, Contextual Understandings and Fostering Talk.

Engagement

A primary result noted was the greater engagement of students with a learning task. The movement gave the tasks an element of fun and the students' enjoyment was very obvious in photographs and video tapes of the various activities. The nature of the tasks also made the students see that they could achieve the aims of the activities and therefore they were more easily engaged. For example, the students knew in the Square Dance that they could learn a series of simple steps to music and that the task was complete at the end of the music. They easily understood the directions to move in and the shapes they were creating when moving. This made the mathematics less confronting and more purposeful and the students responded accordingly. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Mathematics through Movement: An Investigation of the Links between Kinaesthetic and Conceptual Learning: Karen Wood Describes How She Used Dance and Movement to Engage Students in Mathematical Investigations
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.