Nigeria's Afrobeat Legend: What a Fela

African Business, April 2008 | Go to article overview

Nigeria's Afrobeat Legend: What a Fela


Fela Kuti

Anthology 1

2 CD + DVD

Wrasse Records

WRASS199

A composer, saxophonist, keyboard player, choreographer, activist, spiritualist, philosopher and perhaps the greatest African pop musician of the modern era, Fela Anikulapo-Kuti hardly requires an introduction yet he defies the usual categorisation--he is simply a legend.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

Fela is believed to have released 77 albums during a lifetime career devoted to music and social activism, and the two CD discs in this anthology cover a couple of distinct periods--the very early years, from 1964 up to the 1969 Los Angeles sessions, and Fela Kuti with Africa 70.

The life story of this extraordinary musician is reasonably well known. Born in 1938 to a well-to-do and highly respected Yoruba family in Nigeria--his parents expected Fela and his siblings to take full advantage of their upper-middle class background and pursue conventional professions such as law or medicine. But Fela had other ideas. Already a trumpet player, shortly after his father died, in 1958, he travelled to London.

Fela's mother, Funmilayo, might have thought he was safely studying at a university to become a lawyer or a doctor, but he had enrolled at the College of Music. It was in London that he formed his first band, the Koolah Lobitos, a West African Highlife ensemble.

It was also in London, in 1961, that Fela married his first wife Remi, with whom he had a son Femi (himself a Grammy award musician who, although very much his own man, has taken on his late father's mantle); and a daughter, Yeni, who with Remi, continues to run the New African Shrine--the nightclub that Fela established in Lagos.

Returning from London to Lagos, Fela worked as a radio producer for the Nigerian Broadcasting Corporation and continued the Koola Lobitos tradition, reforming the band he started in London.

Afrobeat--born in the USA

The radio work was never going to hold Fela's restless spirit, and the opportunity for Koolah Lobitos to tour the USA in 1969 was eagerly seized upon.

It was to be a defining period in Fela's life although after three months in the US, Fela's American dream began to fade. "We weren't IN the America we'd dreamt of," Fela recalled. "No, man. We were IN trouble! No gigs! No bread! Nothing!" The band ended up in Los Angeles in August, 1969. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Nigeria's Afrobeat Legend: What a Fela
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.