Bush Proposes Medicare, Medicaid Cuts for 2009

By Schneider, Mary Ellen | Clinical Psychiatry News, March 2008 | Go to article overview

Bush Proposes Medicare, Medicaid Cuts for 2009


Schneider, Mary Ellen, Clinical Psychiatry News


In the final budget proposal of his presidency, President Bush is proposing substantial cuts to hospitals, skilled nursing facilities, and graduate medical education.

Leaders in the Democratic-controlled Congress instantly declared the proposal dead on arrival.

Under the plan, the Bush administration has put forth legislative and administrative proposals that would cut $12.8 billion from the Medicare program in fiscal year 2009 and about $183 billion over the next 5 years, largely from hospital and other provider payments. The idea is to slow down the growth rate of the program from 7.2% to 5% over 5 years. But critics say the cuts would harm hospitals that care for low-income patients and train physicians.

The FY 2009 budget proposal calls for freezing payments to inpatient hospitals, long-term care hospitals, skilled nursing facilities, hospices, outpatient hospitals, and ambulance services from 2009 through 2011. Payments would then drop 0.65% annually under the proposal.

The proposal also outlines a payment freeze for inpatient rehabilitation facilities and ambulatory surgical centers in 2010 and 2011, followed by annual cuts. And home health agencies would also see a 0% update from 2009 through 2013 followed by annual payment cuts.

The proposal would reduce indirect medical education add-on payments from 5.5% to 2.2% over the next 3 years, and would eliminate the duplicate hospital indirect medical education payment for Medicare Advantage beneficiaries.

Hospitals would also face additional cuts under the plan. For example, the proposed budget would reduce hospital capital payments by 5% in 2009, and hospital disproportionate share payments would drop 30% over the next 2 years.

The FY 2009 budget plan also includes proposed legislative and administrative changes aimed at cutting nearly $18 billion from Medicaid over the next 5 years.

The administration's budget would reauthorize the State Children's Health Insurance Program (SCHIP) through 2013. The plan calls for a $19.7 billion increase to the program over 5 years, including $450 million in outreach grants to states and other organizations to help enroll uninsured children in the program.

One area that the administration's budget proposal does not address is the 10.6% physician pay cut scheduled to take place this July. The administration's budget "falls short" by not including a proposal to fix the Medicare physician payment formula, the American College of Cardiology said in a statement.

"Physicians are willing to do their part, but quality cannot be achieved under a zero-sum scenario," according to the statement. "Continued deep payment cuts make it impossible for physicians to continue to invest in a health care infrastructure that facilitates data collection and quality improvement while ensuring that patients have access to high quality care. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Bush Proposes Medicare, Medicaid Cuts for 2009
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.