Evidence Base Lacking for Medicare Coverage Decisions

By Sullivan, Leanne | Clinical Psychiatry News, March 2008 | Go to article overview

Evidence Base Lacking for Medicare Coverage Decisions


Sullivan, Leanne, Clinical Psychiatry News


Data reviewed by the Centers for Medicaid and Medicare Services to inform Medicare treatment coverage decisions reflect populations that are significantly different from the Medicare beneficiary population, a recent analysis has shown.

In 1998, the CMS established a panel of physicians and other professionals to review the evidence base before the agency makes national Medicare coverage decisions. The independent panel, now called the Medicare Evidence Development and Coverage Advisory Committee (Med-CAC), reviews the literature described in a technology assessment and votes on the evidence to determine the health benefit of the medical procedure or device, wrote Sanket S. Dhruva and Dr. Rita F. Redberg, both of the University of California, San Francisco, which, along with the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, provided support for the study. Dr. Redberg is a member of MedCAC, but had no financial conflicts of interest to disclose.

To examine whether the data used by MedCAC was generalizable to the Medicare population, Mr. Dhruva and Dr. Redberg looked at all six MedCAC decisions involving a cardiovascular product or service and analyzed the sample size, participant demographics, inclusion criteria, study location, and outcome stratification of the relevant technology assessments. The data in the technology assessments used for these six decisions included 141 peer-reviewed reports and 40,009 patients (Arch. Intern. Med. 2008;168:136-40).

Significant differences were found between the study populations and the Medicare population. Participants in the trials described in the technology assessments were significantly younger (mean age, 60. …

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Evidence Base Lacking for Medicare Coverage Decisions
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