New Agreement Will Cut the Expense of Protecting Intellectual Property Rights; the Knowledge Driven Economy

The Journal (Newcastle, England), April 24, 2008 | Go to article overview

New Agreement Will Cut the Expense of Protecting Intellectual Property Rights; the Knowledge Driven Economy


Byline: Dominic Elsworth

ANEW agreement over European patent procedures is set to halve costs for UK businesses seeking to protect their intellectual property rights across all 31 European states, following France's signing of the London Agreement, which comes into force on May 1 this year.

Up until then a company granted a European patent must be validated in each country where the owner of the patent wishes it to be in force.

This means that a business seeking protection across all 31 of the member states must bear the cost of having what can be a lengthy and technically complex document translated into up to 22 languages.

After the agreement comes into force, states which have declared English, French or German as their official language will opt out of the translation requirements, meaning that a European patent will cover the 10 largest European states without the need for translations to be filed in individual countries.

The agreement comes following the activities of a European working party set up to look at reducing translation costs by 50%, after research showed that the high cost of European patent protection was having a detrimental effect on innovation.

This is good news for UK businesses which seek to protect their intellectual property rights across Europe. Their patent budgets will go significantly further when the agreement comes into force.

Having a patent translated into seven European languages - the average number of translations per application - can easily cost upward of pounds 5,000. The agreement effectively reduces those costs by 45%, which will encourage companies and individuals to file more extensive European patents that protect their rights outside the UK. This will free up more of their research and development budgets, thereby stimulating innovation.

The agreement only needs to be ratified by eight member states, including France, Germany and the UK, to be effective.

However, France's signing of the London Agreement means it has now been agreed by 10 states and as more countries come on board, applicants will be able to protect their intellectual property rights in more European states, but without the previously prohibitive costs of doing so. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

New Agreement Will Cut the Expense of Protecting Intellectual Property Rights; the Knowledge Driven Economy
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.