NSPA Federal Affairs Resolution for 1996

By Lear, Jeffrey A. | The National Public Accountant, January 1996 | Go to article overview

NSPA Federal Affairs Resolution for 1996


Lear, Jeffrey A., The National Public Accountant


Recently, NSPA's Federal Taxation Committee met to discuss tax issues critical to the Society and to plan its annual liaison meeting with the Commissioner of Internal Revenue. One of the most important discussions at the meeting, however, did not address a specific tax issue or a specific clement of the committee's agenda.

During the course of the meeting, the committee devoted considerable time to analyzing where NSPA's government relations are right now and where they need to be. The committee members decided that although NSPA is currently well positioned to gain information and influence legislation through coalitions, the Society needs to focus on becoming more of an independent force in Washington, DC. To accomplish this goal, NSPA will be calling on all of its members to get more active in the legislative process in the year ahead.

WHERE NSPA IS TODAY

As we begin 1996, NSPA is positioned to become one of the major voices on behalf of small business in the nation's capitol. As the Society states on all of its testimony, it is made up of 20,000 members serving over 5 million small business and individual clients. No one organization can boast of a greater collective expertise on all aspects of small business operation in any industry than NSPA. The challenge lies in developing NSPA's ability to gather that expertise and present it to the decisionmakers that need to hear it.

At the staff level, NSPA has one full-time person at the federal level charged with finding the issues relevant to the members, developing those issues, presenting them to relevant committees for consideration, informing the membership at large on the issues, coordinating committee and member response and presenting NSPA's response in the relevant forum. The work entails gathering and imparting information to the Internal Revenue Service, the Small Business Administration and both chambers of Congress. Today, that work is often done through coalitions and close ties with other organizations, both in the practitioner community and among other small business groups.

At the member level, the Society has hundreds of active volunteer leaders on committees and thousands more members who could make valuable contributions to the process. Every NSPA member spends his or her day finding out information that Congress wishes it had before it passed the last tax law. NSPA members experience first-hand the continuing effects of tax laws all the way back to 1986, as well as IRS regulations and court rulings.

WHERE NSPA NEEDS TO BE

The Society must focus on getting the information gained through its members' practices into the hands of the decisionmakers who can utilize it to better serve NSPA members and their clients. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

NSPA Federal Affairs Resolution for 1996
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.