'20Th-Century Food Policies Are Threatening Our Farming Industry'

Western Mail (Cardiff, Wales), May 6, 2008 | Go to article overview

'20Th-Century Food Policies Are Threatening Our Farming Industry'


Byline: Steve Dube Farming Editor

EUROPEAN Farm Commissioner Mariann Fischer Boel was warned last week that EU food security could be threatened by outdated principles underpinning the Common Agricultural Policy and World Trade Organisation talks.

The warning came during a visit by the Commissioner to Farmers' Union of Wales member Edward Jones and his family's Brocastle Farm, near Bridgend, where vast increases in feed and energy costs have undermined recent improvements in milk and livestock prices.

"There are many talented young people with a bright future in agriculture, but the concessions being made in WTO negotiations, coupled with CAP reform, could place major barriers in their way," said Mr Jones.

He farms 200 acres in partnership with four other family members in an enterprise that consists of 70 dairy cattle and 120 sheep, with around 50 beef cattle being fattened each year.

"Our historical CAP allocation reflects the fertility and productivity of the farm, and if it is reduced to a flat rate payment the business will become unviable," he said.

"People have run away with the idea that farm incomes are rising, but for enterprises like ours the rises in the arable sector mean a rise in our feed bills.

"The discussions currently being held regarding the CAP and WTO are based on late 20th-century concepts and politics. They don't seem to have woken up to what's going on in the 21st century."

FUW president Gareth Vaughan said the primary principle underpinning the development of the CAP was the need to stabilise food supply.

"It came as a reaction to the extreme food shortages during and after the war, and we mustn't forget that during that period many thousands of people in Europe died as a result of food shortages," said Mr Vaughan.

"The CAP has meant that for decades we have taken cheap food for granted - in fact the CAP became a victim of its own success, with overproduction leading to a change in the direction of the CAP away from feeding Europe."

Mr Vaughan said many of the older generation, who remembered rationing during the war and postwar periods, were warning that feeding a growing population would once again become a priority issue.

"Just a couple of years ago those people were laughed at. Yet we are now seeing food shortages across the world and major price increases in developed countries," said Mr Vaughan.

His comments came amid news of food riots in Haiti that have brought down a government, and civil unrest in Egypt, Cameroon, Ivory Coast, Mauritania, Ethiopia, Madagascar, the Philippines and Indonesia. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

'20Th-Century Food Policies Are Threatening Our Farming Industry'
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.