Can Self-Regulation Avert Cold Call Law?

By Drummond, Gillian | Marketing, November 2, 1995 | Go to article overview

Can Self-Regulation Avert Cold Call Law?


Drummond, Gillian, Marketing


Alarm bells have been ringing this week as the telemarketing industry discusses the implications of a Europe-led move which could kill off cold calling.

After years of wrangles over the Distance Selling Directive, currently winding its way through the European Parliament, telemarketers now face another hurdle.

A select committee in Brussels last week tabled an amendment which, if successful, would require companies to get written consent from consumers before they called them cold.

Farewell to telemarketing?

There are fears that it could sound the death knell of the [pounds]10.4bn telemarketing industry. It argues that very few customers are going to bother to write back to companies giving their consent and that the added costs of doing that mail-out could cripple businesses.

"It could mean up to 40% job losses for those businesses solely involved in outbound telemarketing," says Colin Fricker, director of legal affairs at the Direct Marketing Association.

But this week industry representatives were keeping their fingers crossed that it wouldn't come to that.

"We think reason should prevail. We can't even consider defeat," says Fricker.

He promises that if next month's reading of the bill goes against them, there will be a mass lobbying of MEPs. But whatever the final ruling, the past week's events again raise questions about the whole telemarketing industry.

Fricker is trying to persuade other European countries to polish up on their practices so that no more legislation is needed. He is talking to Ireland, Belgium and France about introducing services to consumers to protect them from unwanted unsolicited calls.

This is what happened in Britain last January when the DMA, along with companies like BT, Mercury, the Glass & Glazing Federation and the Periodical Publishers' Association, set up the Telephone Preference Service.

Consumers who don't want cold calls can register their name, and the idea is that companies check the TPS lists whenever they do a telemarketing job.

The TPS has been publicised through leaflets from the telephone companies, and so far 70,000 consumers have registered. But, given that 1.7 billion telemarketing calls go out every year, isn't it a drop in the ocean? …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Can Self-Regulation Avert Cold Call Law?
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.