Britain's Mr. Nice Guy

By Underhill, William | Newsweek International, May 26, 2008 | Go to article overview

Britain's Mr. Nice Guy


Underhill, William, Newsweek International


Byline: William Underhill

A rebranding campaign and a struggling British Labour Party are helping to revive the touchy-feely new Conservatives.

Over the past 11 years, the British Conservative Party has endured three successive election defeats and four changes of leadership. Just a year ago, the party had been trailing a stale Labour government by 4 points in the polls. But now, suddenly, the Tories are back. They just trounced Labour in local government elections, including a hotly contested London mayoral race, and voters tell pollsters the current leader, 41-year-old David Cameron, is more likable, more trustworthy--indeed, superior in every quality of leadership--than Prime Minister Gordon Brown. The Tories seemed poised to win again in a mid-May by-election in the northwest England parliamentary district of Crewe and Nantwich, a constituency considered safe Labour territory for more than 30 years. Suddenly Cameron is the front runner to take over Downing Street in the next general election, due within two years.

This newfound popularity is due in part to Cameron's new, gentler political lexicon. Back in 2002, in a much-cited moment of political honesty, Theresa May, a former party chairman and a leading Tory M.P., shocked her audience at a party conference by asserting that the Conservatives were seen as "the nasty party," a reputation Cameron inherited with the leadership three years later. But gone are the days when the party appeared to stand for red-blooded individualism and unconstrained wealth creation. It is now the Conservatives, not Labour, who complain of soulless materialism among the country's rulers. In addition to traditional party themes, such as rolling back the power of the state, Cameron's speeches are peppered with references to "social justice" and "work-life balance." While campaigning in the Crewe by-election, Conservative Party candidate Edward Timpson carried his 2-year-old daughter on his back.

This modernization strategy has also played on environmental concerns that have helped align the Conservatives with the young, a group long seen as leery of the party. The party's old flaming-torch emblem is gone, replaced by a fuzzy blue and green image of a tree in full leaf. Cameron has been photographed on a sleigh in the Arctic researching the impact of climate change. He has bicycled to work (albeit followed by aides in a car carrying his papers), and is about to install a wind turbine at his London home. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Britain's Mr. Nice Guy
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.