Break Through: From the Death of Environmentalism to the Politics of Possibility

By Paehlke, Robert | Alternatives Journal, March-April 2008 | Go to article overview

Break Through: From the Death of Environmentalism to the Politics of Possibility


Paehlke, Robert, Alternatives Journal


Break through: From the Death of Environmentalism to the politics of possibility. Ted Nordhaus and Michael Shellenberger, Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2007, 344 Pages.

The Landscape of Reform: Civic Pragmatism and Environmental Thought in America, Ben A. Minteer, Cambridge: MIT Press, 2006, 264 Pages.

In 2004, the essay "The Death of Environmentalism: Global Warming Politics in a Post-Environmental World," rocked the environmental community. Its authors, Ted Nordhaus and Michael Shellenberger, dared to doubt that the recent efforts of major environmental organizations were the best way to advance environmental protection, thereby sparking a heated international debate. Break Through is its sequel. And while sequels are rarely more notable than the original hit, in this case, the sequel works.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

Nordhaus and Shellenberger continue their argument against "small-bore campaigns"--efforts that seek incremental legislative and regulatory improvements. More specifically, they rail against isolating environmental issues from other important political concerns, such as economic security and social fairness. Environmental progress today, according to this pair of environmental strategists, requires broad political support, as well as large-scale economic and political transformation.

Organizations that encourage citizens to send postcards to political leaders who are hostile to environmental protection are fruitless efforts according to Nord-haus and Shellenberger. Neo-conservatives resist any new environmental initiatives. Such politics can only be reversed at the ballot box or through the mobilization of broad-based socio-political movements, not in capitol corridors. thick with ambitious legislators and predatory lobbyists.

The politics of fundamental change prescribed by the authors does not necessarily come from the far left. What is envisioned is a movement that combines environmental protection with social and economic needs. This new movement's message would not be about tomorrow's environmental horrors, and it would not be sold as frugality and cutting back. It would be about harnessing American ingenuity. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Break Through: From the Death of Environmentalism to the Politics of Possibility
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.