Classic Holiday Gift Comes in Many Shapes and Sizes

By McDermott, Holly; Roberts, Rex | Insight on the News, December 25, 1995 | Go to article overview

Classic Holiday Gift Comes in Many Shapes and Sizes


McDermott, Holly, Roberts, Rex, Insight on the News


Get her a book," advises the solicitous clerk as the holiday shopper scratches his head.

"But she has a book," comes the anguished reply.

Despite competition from videos, compact discs and CD-ROMS, books remain the classic gift for someone who has everything - even someone who doesn't read, since many of the lavish tomes crowding the shelves this time of year are made for coffee, rather than bedside, tables.

Take, for example, The History of Beads (Harry N. Abrams, $19.95 pb, 136 pp) by Lois Sherr Dubin - an extravagance worth its weight in baubles. This is real beads, with 103 color photographs plus an eight-page pullout charting the craft from neolithic times to the present. For those interested in flower arranging, th boo Baskets: Japanese Art and Culture Interwoven With the Beauty of Ikebana by Maggie Oster (Viking Studio, $34.95, 144 pp). The ceramicist will find joy in Art Deco and Modernist Ceramics (Thames & Hudson, $45, 192 pp) by Karen McCready, with lovingly photographed examples of the craft from Servres to Disney - Minnie and Mickey Mouse are popular in porcelain, too.

More pertinent to the season, perhaps, is Miracles: The Extraordinary, the Impossible, and the Divine (Viking Studio, $22.95, 224 pp) by Carol Neiman, a copiously illustrated meditation on the preternatural, ranging from the apparition of the Virgin Mary at Fatima to tribal shamans and psychics. For And I Shall Dwell Among Them: Historic Synagogues of the World (Aperture, $50, 176 pp), Neil Folberg has photographed houses of worship in Europe, Asia and the Americas - from the Caribbean to Uzbekistan to Israel. Penne L. Restad's Christmas in America: A History (Oxford, $25, 219 pp) traces the origins of many of the customs we take for granted, including the Christmas tree, and follows the transformation of St. Nicholas into Santa Claus during the colonial era.

Readers who like happy endings will enjoy Paul Richard Evan's The Christmas Box (Simon & Schuster, $12.95,125 pp), wherein a workaholic father rediscovers the meaning of Christmas and family. On the other hand, naughty children can seek consolation in Mark Twain's Book for Bad Boys and Girls (Contemporary Books, $12.95,173 pp), edited by R. Kent Rasmussen - a brilliant collection of essays and stories for mischief-makers of all ages.

As Twain advises, "Let us swear while we may, for in heaven it may not be allowed." To facilitate such spirited wassail, connoisseurs can turn to The Guinness Drinking Companion (Lyons & Burford, $22.95, 224 pp). Leslie Dunkling elaborates on the history, traditions and worldwide consumption of beers, ciders, spirits and liquors, with recipes and witty quotations to make the most sober reader smile. One section illuminates "Dickensian Drinking" and other literary pursuits.

Speaking of literature, the editors at Oxford Press have been busy as elves assembling anthologies too numerous to list. Among them: The Oxford Book of Adventure Stories ($25, 410 pp), which takes readers out to sea with Edgar Allan Poe and across deserts with Rudyard Kipling, and The Oxford Book of Historical Stories ($25, 441 pp), with similar snippets from William Faulkner, Robert Louis Stevenson and others. The Oxford Book of Letters ($30, 559 pp), edited by Frank Kermode and Anita Kermode, offers glimpses into the thoughts of Ben Franklin, Oscar Wilde and Emily Dickinson, as well as ordinary people who practiced the epistolary art between 1535 and 1985. The World Treasury of Love Stories ($30, 592 pp) includes Chekhov's "Lady With the Pet Dog," Eudora Welty's "The Wide Net" and 36 other lyrical tales by Gustave Flaubert, Italo Calvino, Yukio Mishima and more familiar English and American writers.

Pulp fiction made a comeback in 1995. The Western Story (Nebraska, $35, 404 pp), edited by John Tuska, chronicles the American West from 1892 to 1994 as depicted by Frederic Remington, Willa Cather and others. Tuska also put together Shadow of the Lariat (Carton & Graf, $25,564 pp), an anthology of Western stories gleaned from Lariat magazine, which published writers such as Zane Grey and Walt "King of the Pulps" Cobrun between 1925 and 1950. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Classic Holiday Gift Comes in Many Shapes and Sizes
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.