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The reason I would or would not use corporal punishment with children is ...

I would not use corporal punishment because it will teach children that violence is acceptable and that living under the law is more important than living and having respect for our relationships out of love for God and for others.

Marvin L. Klein

Dunlap, Iowa

We would because children grow up to live in the real world where life involves rules, regulations, and negative consequences for not complying with the rules of society.

H.M. and K. G. Mayhan

Sonora, Calif.

I'd use moderate physical punishment, accompanied by an explanation and expression of love.

J .W. Dempsey

Tulsa, Okla.

I would never use corporal punishment with children. I know what it feels like firsthand. My stepmother was very violent with me, and at 47 years old I still am recovering from the abuse with post-traumatic stress disorder and generalized anxiety disorder.

Wendy Reed

Lawrence, Kan.

To protect them from hurting themselves. Sounds hypocritical, but wouldn't you hit a child if he were about to step in front of a train after you tried every other peaceful, respectful way to stop him?

Steve Gold

Auburn, Calif.

Almost always when I resorted to spanking it was out of exhaustion, frustration, or anger, and I nearly always regretted it, as I felt I'd lost control of myself.

Marygrace Elson

Iowa City, Iowa

It's only good until the child is verbal enough to be reasoned with. Using spanking after that only makes the child feel like a baby.

Kim Eidson

Escondido, Calif.

Mom and Dad raised nine children, and we were no angels. At times she would reason with us first, and if that didn't work, we got it with the willow switch. It wasn't bad and we all turned out OK.

Name withheld

Bonners Ferry, Idaho

Your definition of corporal punishment is missing. A swat on the bottom is an attention-getter. All too often children do not respond to verbal warnings.

Name withheld

Nebraska City, Neb.

The most effective form of discipline I've used or seen used with kids is ...

High expectations with follow-through, consistency, and praise.

Jim Connell

Hayden, Idaho

Logical consequences--allowing them to experience the consequences of their behavior while protecting them from danger.

Cathy Johnston

Olympia, Wash.

To model the behavior you desire from your children. No swearing. No drinking alcohol. No vegging out in front of the TV. Thoughtful, engaged behavior with whomever you meet. Recognize that God is present in each of us and we should acknowledge that presence.

Name withheld

Phoenix, Ariz.

A form of time-outs using shorter time-outs with younger children and longer ones with older children.

Beverly A. Malbie

Corvallis, Ore.

Make them suffer the consequences of their behavior. Denial of privileges they usually have.

James Jepson

Sonoma, Calif.

Corporal punishment--one easily forgets a loss of privileges for a time, but I have never forgotten my father giving me a well-deserved spanking.

Jerry Mazenko

Garden Grove, Calif.

The least effective form of discipline I've used or seen used with kids is ...

Discussing and offering options--at least with younger children. Sometimes "Because I am the morn and I said so" is OK. We give kids too many opportunities to question authority by teaching them it's OK to negotiate in every situation.

Jennifer Melsness

East Wenatchee, Wash.

Fostering fear. Dependence on pleasing the parent.

Ruth Elsbernd

Dubuque, Iowa

Verbal abuse. If verbal abuse and emotional harassment replace physical pain, we won't be any better off. …

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