Contributors

Frontiers - A Journal of Women's Studies, January 2008 | Go to article overview

Contributors


CORTNEY CRONBERG BARKO is a doctoral candidate in English at Northern Illinois University. Her article "Rediscovering Female Voice and Authority: The Revival of Female Artists in Wendy Wasserstein's The Heidi Chronicles" was First Place Graduate Essay in Northern Illinois University's 2006 Women's History Month Essay Contest. The article was also presented at the Midwest Popular Culture Association Conference in Indianapolis, Indiana, in 2006. She is working on her dissertation, which will focus on women's writing in contemporary American and British fiction inspired by artists and paintings.

HOLLY BLACKFORD (PhD, University of California, Berkeley) is an Assistant Professor of English at Rutgers University-Camden, and currently holds an elected position as article award committee member for the Children's Literature Association. She teaches American, children's, and adolescent literature, as well as literatures in English, and has published articles on Louisa May Alcott, Emily Bronte, J.M. Barrie, Carlo Collodi, Anita Diamont, julia Aluvarez, shirley Jackson, Margaret Atwood, Henry James, Mark Twain, and Harper Lee. Her book Out of this World: Why Literature Matters to Girls (Teachers College Press, education division of Columbia, 2004) analyzes the empirical reader-responses of girls to literature.

EILEEN BORIS, Professor and chair of the Women's Studies Program at the University of California, Santa Barbara, specializes in gender, race, work, and the welfare state. Her latest book is The Practice of U.S. Women's History: Narratives, Dialogues, and Intersections, coedited with Vicki Ruiz and S.J. Kleinberg (Rutgers 2007). With Jennifer Klein of Yale, she is finishing Caring for America: How Home Health Workers Became the New Face of Labor, to be published by Oxford University Press.

MYRIAM J. A. CHANCY, a Haitian/Canadian writer, was born in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, and raised in Quebec City and Winnipeg. Her first novel, Spirit of Haiti, was a finalist in the Best First Book Category, Canada/Caribbean region, of the Commonwealth Prize 2004; her other novels include The Scorpion's Claw and, forthcoming, The Loneliness of Angels. She is also author of two books of literary criticism, Framing Silence: Revolutionary Novels by Haitian Women and Searching for Safe Spaces: Afro-Caribbean Women Writers in Exile.

Her work as editor-in-chief of the Ford Foundation-funded academic and arts journal, Meridians: feminism, race, transnationalism (2002-2004) was recognized with the Phoenix Award for Editorial Achievement (2004). She recently completed a memoir, Fractured, and is at work on a book-length academic work entitled, Floating Islands: Cosmopolitanish and Racial Identity Formation in a Transnational Age. She is currently Professor of English at Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana.

AUDREY FERBER received an MFA in writing from Mills College. Her essays and book reviews have appeared in the San Francisco Chronicle and the San Jose Mercury News. Her short stories have been anthologized. She is at work on an essay about gender roles and social dancing, and a novel set in an 1870s Shaker community in New Lebanon, New York.

MARA JEVERA FULMER has exhibited and published in the United States and abroad, including Australia and Fiji. …

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