How Games Can Go Where Movies Never Can; in Association with CODE WORKS CONNECT Supporting Digital Industry Perfect Image the Producer of One of the Coolest British Films in Recent Years Has Turned His Back on the Movie Industry for Now to Join the North East's Global Video Games Revolution. Andrew Mernin Talks to American Todd Eckert to Find out Why Games Are Set to Blow Movies out of the Water

The Journal (Newcastle, England), June 5, 2008 | Go to article overview

How Games Can Go Where Movies Never Can; in Association with CODE WORKS CONNECT Supporting Digital Industry Perfect Image the Producer of One of the Coolest British Films in Recent Years Has Turned His Back on the Movie Industry for Now to Join the North East's Global Video Games Revolution. Andrew Mernin Talks to American Todd Eckert to Find out Why Games Are Set to Blow Movies out of the Water


WHEN actor Sam Riley and his backing band gave a frighteningly accurate rendition of Joy Division songs, it brought to an end years of hard work for Todd Eckert.

The producer had spent four years helping to create the movie Control - the profile of Joy Division's enigmatic lead singer Ian Curtis.

And, as the lights were switched off and sets dismantled, the cast performed Curtis's songs note for note in an on-stage performance to celebrate the end of filming.

But while such memories clearly bring much joy to Eckert in his career as a film producer, he has seen the future and left that world behind him for now.

The American believes video games are set to take over movies as the world's dominant medium, and so has joined Newcastle-based games firm Eutechnyx to lead its expansion into the US.

nedigitalbusiness crossed the pond to find out why the producer has so much faith in the video games industry.

nedigitalbusiness: How long will it be before the games industry becomes the world's dominant entertainment medium and what are the indicators that this shift is already under way?

Todd Eckert: Grand Theft Auto IV is the evidence. Regardless what you think of its sensibilities, it is the largest media release ever - bigger than any movie or album. To me it's also a tech issue.

When people are able to identify with characters in a game on an emotional level, then make decisions that will impact those characters' actions, they'll become real participants in their own entertainment and therefore have meaningful relationships with the games. Film could never do this by virtue of the medium's constraints.

It has the power to move, but not the potential to move "personally".

What mistakes have been made by the movie industry that the games industry can learn from?

Film is a giant industry and there are great films made every year. Unfortunately the industry today is frequently more focused on making money than in making features worth two hours' dedication.

The conventional wisdom is that the lowest common denominator of entertainment will sell the most tickets, and therefore you have this sort of rehashed, senseless goo getting made as the norm. It's easier to green light something like a reworking of The Dukes of Hazard than to cough up even a small budget for anything new. To the public, a game's success is still experience-based.

Which is the more lucrative industry to be involved in?

There's money to be made in both but I think owning a successful game IP has the potential of being far more valuable in the long-term than film. It's certainly more difficult to pirate a game, which is awfully helpful today, and that includes the viral piracy that exists over the internet with film. I was talking to a band after a gig a couple weeks ago here in the States, and they said they loved Control, in fact they had watched it just the night before on the tour bus. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

How Games Can Go Where Movies Never Can; in Association with CODE WORKS CONNECT Supporting Digital Industry Perfect Image the Producer of One of the Coolest British Films in Recent Years Has Turned His Back on the Movie Industry for Now to Join the North East's Global Video Games Revolution. Andrew Mernin Talks to American Todd Eckert to Find out Why Games Are Set to Blow Movies out of the Water
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.