Hostility, Fasting Glucose Linked in Black Women

By Kerri, Wachter | Clinical Psychiatry News, May 2008 | Go to article overview

Hostility, Fasting Glucose Linked in Black Women


Kerri, Wachter, Clinical Psychiatry News


BALTIMORE -- African American women with high levels of hostility show increased levels of fasting glucose. In addition, patients' proportion of trunk fat appears to play a role in the association between hostility and glucose metabolism, results from two posters presented at the annual meeting of the American Psychosomatic Society show.

In the first poster, Anastasia Georgiades, Ph.D., a research associate in the department of psychiatry and behavioral science at Duke University, Durham, N.C., and her colleagues recruited 400 healthy, nondiabetic individuals--101 African American women, 118 white women, 82 African American men, and 99 white men. Mean age was 33 years. Hostility was measured using the 27-item Cook Medley hostility questionnaire. Fasting and postprandial glucose and insulin levels were measured with an oral glucose tolerance test.

General linear modeling showed that African American women had consistent positive associations between hostility and fasting glucose, postprandial glucose, and postprandial insulin. In contrast, African American men showed negative associations. Stratified correlation analysis revealed that only African American women showed a significant positive association between hostility and fasting glucose.

The results indicate that hostility may have a greater impact on glucose metabolism in African American women, which could help explain racial and gender-based health disparities.

The second poster study built on these results, showing a consistent hostility/glucose metabolism association among African American women. Dr. Georgiades and her colleagues hypothesized that this relationship might be mediated by trunk fat, given that abdominal fat has been associated with both fasting glucose levels and insulin resistance.

For the study, the researchers recruited 44 African American and 77 white nondiabetic women. The women had either high (greater than 12) or low (less than 9) scores on the 27-item Cook Medley hostility questionnaire. The women underwent several assessments, including an oral fasting glucose tolerance test and dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) scan. The researchers included DXA scans because body mass index is a rather imprecise measure of body fat and does not take into account the distribution of body fat. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Hostility, Fasting Glucose Linked in Black Women
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.