Brain Regions Associated with Satiety Identified

By Wachter, Kerri | Clinical Psychiatry News, May 2008 | Go to article overview

Brain Regions Associated with Satiety Identified


Wachter, Kerri, Clinical Psychiatry News


A new imaging study that has identified areas of brain activation associated with feelings of fullness may provide new therapeutic targets to minimizing overeating.

Researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory found that not only are the left amygdala, left posterior insula, and left precuneus activated during periods of increased stomach volume, subjects with a body mass index (BMI) in the overweight range had less activation of these regions than did those with healthy BMIs under the same conditions (NeuroImage 2007[Epubdoi:10.1016/j.neuroimage.2007.11.008]).

"By stimulating feelings of fullness with an expandable balloon, we saw the activation of different areas of the brain in normal weight and overweight people," said lead author Dr. Gene-Jack Wang.

To study the brain's response during gradual distention produced by moderate food intake, and to better understand the mechanisms underlying normal and abnormal eating behavior, the researchers used gastric balloon distention. During this procedure, a balloon is placed in the stomach and filled with water warmed to normal body temperature (37 [degrees]C). previous functional MRI (fMRI) studies using this technique have used sudden volume changes, but for this study, balloon volume was changed slowly to study the brain's response to slow stomach distention that mimics normal food intake.

During the cycles, after 30 seconds the empty balloon was filled with 500 mL of water over a 90-second period, when balloon volume reached 500 mL, flow was interrupted for 30 seconds and the ballon was emptied over a 90-second period. After a 30-second pause, the cycle was repeated.

The study involved three female and 15 male healthy volunteers (mean age 32 years), with a BMI below 30 kg/[m.sup.2] (average 24.4). Participants were studied between 16 and 18 hours after the last meal.

During the last 16 seconds of the pauses, participants rated their fullness, discomfort, hunger, and desire for food. The questions were projected on MRI-compatible goggles. Participants chose one of four possible answers--not at all, just a little, somewhat, and very much--by pressing one of four colored buttons. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Brain Regions Associated with Satiety Identified
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.