Gandhi Be Serious? Irishman Dermot Dresses as Indian Leader and Walks Thousands of Miles across U.S. with Message of Peace

The Mirror (London, England), June 14, 2008 | Go to article overview

Gandhi Be Serious? Irishman Dermot Dresses as Indian Leader and Walks Thousands of Miles across U.S. with Message of Peace


Byline: BY EOIN REYNOLDS

GANDHI has reappeared in America with his message of peace for the world - and he's Irish.

Dermot Butterly, 39, is on a mission to cross the US on foot dressed as the great Indian leader.

The musician, from Laytown, Co Meath, said yesterday: "Gandhi is a universal symbol of peace and I wanted to bring that back.

"Gandhi also said, 'We must be the change we wish to see in the world'. Those words inspired me to do something.

"Peace has got to come from within. Even just talking about peace helps create peace."

Dermot set off 28 days ago from the Self-Realisation Fellowship in Los Angeles, where some of Gandhi's ashes are kept.

Rising at 5am to avoid the midday sun, he walks 15 miles every day. He will have walked 3,000 miles and crossed 12 states by the time he arrives in Washington on November 5 - his 40th birthday and a day after the US presidential election.

Dermot is also raising funds for the people of Soro in Orissa, India. He said: "These people literally have nothing.

"We want to raise money to build a community centre and school to give them something. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Gandhi Be Serious? Irishman Dermot Dresses as Indian Leader and Walks Thousands of Miles across U.S. with Message of Peace
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.