Roe Finds God, Prays for Life

By Duin, Julia; Hallow, Ralph Z. | Insight on the News, February 19, 1996 | Go to article overview

Roe Finds God, Prays for Life


Duin, Julia, Hallow, Ralph Z., Insight on the News


The plaintiff in Roe vs. Wade, the case that legalized abortion in the United States, has become an active Christian and pro-life activist.

When pro-choice icon Norma McCorvey announced her conversion to Christianity in August, someone rented a billboard in north Dallas proclaiming, "Welcome to the Lord Jesus Christ, Norma!" But McCorvey, who is better known as "Jane Roe" as in Roe vs. Wade, sent conflicting signals, saying she still favored first-trimester abortions and was maintaining a lesbian relationship with her housemate, Connie Gonzales.

That all has changed, McCorvey says in her first interview since the media storm after her baptism in a Dallas swimming pool. "I am not a lesbian. I'm just a child in Christ now," she says. McCorvey, 48, adds that her relationship with Gonzales, 64, has been platonic for the last three years. "We decided we'd rather be friends than lovers. You know, honey, after you pass 40, you don't feel a lot of anything."

Abortion-rights activists discount McCorvey's public flip-flop. "Most of the pro-choice community does not think that her change of heart has affected the issue or movement at all," says Vicki Saporta, executive director of the National Abortion Federation. Nevertheless, abortion-rights activists reacted with shock when McCorvey was baptized. She had converted to Christianity a few weeks before, on July 22, when she walked forward to make a public profession of faith in Christ at Hillcrest Bible Church in north Dallas. She has begun studying the Bible, attending church twice a week and taking a beginners' class there.

She prays, sometimes from 1 a.m. to 3 a.m. "How is it I can serve you?" she says she asks God. "How can I please you and make you smile on me? I guess he's still thinking about it. `Okay, McCorvey,' he's saying, `what are we going to do with you? …

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