'Harper's' Now Questioning Bob Woodward's Speeches and Foundation

Editor & Publisher, June 13, 2008 | Go to article overview

'Harper's' Now Questioning Bob Woodward's Speeches and Foundation


After criticizing Washington Post columnist David Broder Thursday for giving speeches to business groups, Harper's magazine writer Ken Silverstein now says Bob Woodward is doing much the same thing.

Silverstein also writes that the Watergate reporting legend's charitable foundation -- which reportedly gets money from Woodward's speeches -- gives some of its donations to places like an elite private school.

"Well, it turns out that the Post's Bob Woodard, like Broder, has had a rewarding career speaking to corporate groups," noted Silverstein, citing the American Council of Life Insurers, American Bankruptcy Institute, American Frozen Food Institute, National Association of Chain Drug Stores, National Association of Real Estate Investment Trusts, and various other organizations.

"What does he do with the money?," the Harper's writer asked. "He and his wife have a foundation (The Woodward Walsh Foundation), so maybe the money is going there -- in which case he's still getting a tax break. A review of the foundation's records shows that a good chunk of its donations go to Sidwell Friends, a well-funded elite private school in Washington, D.C., that his children have attended."

Silverstein said he could not reach Woodward for a response. Neither could E&P when Woodward's office was called Friday afternoon.

In a second piece, Silverstein wrote that Woodward used to question journalists going on the lecture circuit. "But based on what I've found," he added, "Woodward has given dozens of speeches over the past five years (often at cushy resorts)."

Silverstein continued: "In his 1996 'Frontline' interview, Woodward said he gave all of his lecture money to . …

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