How the World Sees Us

American Libraries, June-July 2008 | Go to article overview

How the World Sees Us


"[Eric Clapton] used to look so cool and sexy and I can't see that in him now. He looks as if he spends his time in a library boning up on all kinds of wonderful information. It's very odd, he's a bit of a chameleon but he's changed radically now." Eric Clapton's ex-wife PAT-TIE BOYD, Contactmusic.com, Apr. 9.

"But then twitching nervously in the presence of a librarian wasn't an uncommon response--librarians, like ministers of religion, and poets, and people with serious mental health disorders, can make people nervous. Librarians possess a kind of occult power, an aura. They could silence people with just a glance. At least, they did in Israel's fantasies. In Israel's fantasies, librarians were mild-mannered superheroes, with extrasensory perceptions and shape-shifting capacities and a highly developed sense of responsibility who demanded respect from everyone they met. In reality, Israel couldn't silence even Mrs. Onions on her mobile phone when she was disturbing other readers on the van." IAN SANSOM, The Book Stops Here: A Mobile Library Mystery (Harper Paper-back, forthcoming, Aug. 2008).

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

"After a cursory walk through various soon-to-be-irrelevant classrooms, Drexler showed Pryor the cafeteria, the gym, and the football field and locker room. The inquisitive Pryor then asked about the location of the campus library, further impressing Drexler with his sense of humor. 'The library,' chuckled Drexler. 'He really had me for a second." Satirical take on high school football star TERRELLE PRYOR's first visit to Ohio State University, Serious Sports News Network, Mar. 27.

"People missed their library. Many of them in ways they hadn't anticipated. One could even go so far as to say that, for some people, the library being closed for so many months had a negative effect on the lives of many members of the community. …

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