Internet Safety

By Hanes, Mark; Roll, Matt | Phi Delta Kappan, June 2008 | Go to article overview

Internet Safety


Hanes, Mark, Roll, Matt, Phi Delta Kappan


Staying safe on the Internet is important. But as our online lives continue to expand, we need to ask ourselves, How safe are we? And while Internet safety may start with keeping children safe, everyone in a community needs to be aware of potential problems and on guard against them. Listed below are some useful and informative websites to help all individuals in the community keep themselves and their loved ones safe while they surf.

www.staysafeonline.org

This website is a good place to begin learning about cyber security. It is geared toward home users, small-business owners, and education audiences. Take a test to answer the question "How safe are you?" The National Cyber Security Alliance hosts the site, and sponsors include the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, the Federal Trade Commission, and a number of corporations and organizations in the private sector.

http://security.getnetwise.org

Created by the Internet Education Foundation, GetNetWise puts Internet users just "one click away" from the resources they need for online security. Users can also learn some basic information, such as what a firewall is and how to activate one, and pick up security tips. GetNetWise even offers a Safe Cyber Surfer Quiz for children.

www.isafe.org

Founded in 1998 and endorsed by the U.S. Congress, i-Safe bills itself as the worldwide leader in Internet safety education. Its stated mission is to "educate and empower youth to make their Internet experiences safe and responsible." While incorporating classroom curriculum, i-Safe helps students, teachers, and parents to take steps to make the Internet a safer place.

www.cybersmart.org/home

This website helps educators and students learn the 21st-century skills they need with a margin of safety. Students, parents, and teachers can use the site to become more informed and work on lessons that deal with Internet safety and ethical computing. A number of professional development opportunities are available as well. …

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