Maria Lassnig; Talks about Her Exhibition at the Serpentine Gallery in London

By Hochdorfer, Achim | Artforum International, Summer 2008 | Go to article overview

Maria Lassnig; Talks about Her Exhibition at the Serpentine Gallery in London


Hochdorfer, Achim, Artforum International


THE ART-HISTORICAL CATEGORY of "late work," which emerged around the end of the eighteenth century, has itself begun to show signs of age. Strictly speaking, the kind of major, self-contained phase of artistic production defined by the term is carried out late in life by an exceptional figure who has freed him- or herself from all historical constraints and confronted the absolute head-on. Such a formulation was held to be true by intellectuals as recent as Gilles Deleuze and Felix Guattari, who wrote at the beginning of their final book, What is Philosophy? (1991): "There are times when old age produces not eternal youth but a sovereign freedom, a pure necessity in which one enjoys a moment of grace between life and death, and in which all the parts of the machine come together to send into the future a beam that cuts across all ages." With the speed of artistic developments during the twentieth century and after, however, it has become increasingly difficult for artists to keep up with the changes in style demanded by the market. In turn, there is hardly anybody whose early work is not held up against his or her late work as a sign of the failure to develop over the decades and assert his or her relevance anew in changing contexts. And yet such ongoing pertinence is precisely what eighty-eight-year-old painter Maria Lassnig has sustained throughout her lifeas is made clear once more in her most recent survey exhibition, currently at the Serpentine Gallery in London. The show, which remains on view through June 8, puts into service vibrant colors, multilayered emotional effects, and a striking intensity to condense more than a half century's experience of painting and theory into roughly thirty canvases, most of them produced during the past three years.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

Following her education at the Vienna Academy of Fine Arts between 1941 and 1944, Lassnig played a key role in the emergence of art informer in Austria, and in the early 1950s she exhibited in Vienna with abstract painters such as Arnu lf Rainer and Josef Mikl. Around this time, Lassnig became interested in the linguistic games and theories of the Wiener Gruppe, a literary circle centered on Oswald Wiener, H. C. Artmann, Gerhard Ruhm, and Friedrich Achleitner; and she met Andre Breton and Paul Celan on trips to Paris. She moved to the French capital in 1961, but by the decade's end she was living in New York, where she remained until 1980, getting to know Dan Graham, Vito Acconci, and others. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Maria Lassnig; Talks about Her Exhibition at the Serpentine Gallery in London
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.