CULTURE: Moving Independent Pictures; Roger Shannon Reports from the Edinburgh Film Festival Where He Finds Independent Productions in Rude Health

The Birmingham Post (England), June 30, 2008 | Go to article overview

CULTURE: Moving Independent Pictures; Roger Shannon Reports from the Edinburgh Film Festival Where He Finds Independent Productions in Rude Health


Byline: Roger Shannon

Before going up to Edinburgh for the 62nd edition of the Edinburgh International Film Festival (June 18-29) I checked with film director Yugesh Walia when his first film Mirror, Mirror had screened at the festival. That had been my first visit to this long running and most prestigious of film festivals, as well as my first experience of film production.

Although having just returned from Los Angeles, where he, and brother Sunandan, had met the film studio heads and the Hollywood talent agencies, his memory was refreshingly non jetlagged, and clear as HD - 'It was August 1980, and Mirror, Mirror was selected for the main Programme.' So in 2008, this would be my 28th annual pilgrimage to the Film Festival that legendary director John Huston once tellingly described as "the only Festival worth a damn."

However, this year I wasn't travelling up in August when the whole of Edinburgh is wrapped in the all encompassing ribbons and packaging of its International Arts Festival. I was making the visit in June.

The Edinburgh International Film Festival took a bold step this year.

Not only did it shift its timing from August where it has been ever since I first tasted its smorgasbord of movies many years ago, but it also took on a new manifesto as a Festival of Discovery, which has been interpreted as an adventurous pitch to be a world-class festival in its own right - the "Sundance of Europe"

- with formidable clout to propel new talent from the UK and beyond into international recognition.

Much like Robert Redford's Sundance Festival in the United States has done for Independent Cinema (Steven Soderbergh, Quentin Tarantino, HarveyWeinstein, Miramax etc).

The festival, the world's longest continually running film festival, has taken a casino sized gamble by detaching itself from Edinburgh's famous international arts festival, which takes over every part of the Scottish capital in August - a cauldron of cultural tourism.

However, in June other venues can be used, new collaborations made, and the visiting film professionals can all book hotels and restaurants.

It's a new way for the festival to breathe.

Moving the Edinburgh Film Festival to June is part of an emerging strategy for film festivals in the UK, spearheaded by the UK Film Council, from whom the Edinburgh Film Festival has been awarded pounds 1.8 million over three years to achieve their new goals.

This strategy also has benefits for Birmingham, as the Flatpack Festival, creatively engineered by 7 Inch Cinema, was awarded pounds 70,000.

This is richly deserved recognition for the magnificent 7 Inch Cinema who have developed organically from Birmingham's filmic underworld sifting like cinematic archaeologists the city's symbolic subconscious, while also importing film, video and digital gems from neglected troves. The Flatpack Festival will re-assemble next year.

The Edinburgh programme included a large British contingent, out in greater force than ever, with 12 of the festival's 15 world premieres, and another dozen movies emerging from the domestic film industry. The opening film was the world premiere of John Maybury's The Edge Of Love, the period romance about the tangled war time love life of the Welsh poet, Dylan Thomas, played by Matthew Rhys.

The film, in its style of taking a slice of time in the life of an artistic experimenter, is reminiscent of his earlier Love Is The Devil, a portrait of the artist, Francis Bacon.

Maybury brings his sensual palette and eye to 1940's blitzed London, and their less cramped lives in Wales.

Keira Knightley (whose Scottish mother Sharman Macdonald wrote the script) and Sienna Miller provided the star wattage at the red carpeted premiere. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

CULTURE: Moving Independent Pictures; Roger Shannon Reports from the Edinburgh Film Festival Where He Finds Independent Productions in Rude Health
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.