In Memoriam: Adolph Lowe, 1893-1995

By Lissner, Will | The American Journal of Economics and Sociology, January 1996 | Go to article overview

In Memoriam: Adolph Lowe, 1893-1995


Lissner, Will, The American Journal of Economics and Sociology


A pathbreaking economist and a lifelong advocate of freedom, Professor Adolph Lowe, last surviving member of the faculty of Alvin Johnson's "university-in-exile" - the Graduate Faculty of Political and Social Science of New York's New School for Social Research - died in Wolfenbuttel, Germany on June 3, 1995. He was 102 years old.

Dr. Lowe was associated with the American Journal of Economics and Sociology from 1940 until his passing. Even earlier in 1935, in the course of preparing to found the Journal, I encountered his book, entitled Economics and Sociology: A Plea for Co-operation in the Social Sciences. The words that appear towards the bottom of the front cover of every issue of this Journal" constructive synthesis in the social sciences" are the words of John Dewey which were used by Lowe in his dedication of the book to both Franz Oppenheimer, the great Georgist and a founder of modern German sociology, and the latter's successor at the University of Frankfort, Karl Mannheim.

Despite the Journal's early championing of an interdisciplinary approach to social science and the widespread adoption of it in higher education, the first doctorate in the research approach it favored was awarded only in 1995. This is a long time after the 1920s when a committee on urban problems advocated it at the University of Chicago.

John Dewey taught philosophy at Chicago and the approach originated within the age-old history of philosophy when synthesis became one of its primary goals. The aim was to add to the corpus of human knowledge a synthesis based on facts tested and derived from science.

Oppenheimer, a physician with a second doctorate in economics, and his friend, colleague, literary executor, and lawyer turned economist, Lowe, became advocates of internal colonization as a means of ending the societal alienation of people made redundant by technological progress. Oppenheimer founded colonies in Germany which flourished until Hitler suppressed them because most of the colonists were of the Jewish faith. Both scholars had been among the major influences on the construction of the economy and society of the State of Israel.

Adolph Lowe was born in Stuttgart in Southwest Germany, one of the centers of bourgeois revolution in 1848, and educated in Berlin and Tubingen. From 1919 to 1924 he was Section Head in the Ministries of Labor and Economics of the Weimar Republic. Then he became Head of the International Division of the German Federal Statistical Bureau. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • A full archive of books and articles related to this one
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

In Memoriam: Adolph Lowe, 1893-1995
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.